Acadia National Park Travel Guide

USA  #4 in Best Places to Visit in October
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Courtesy of Ken Brown/Getty Images

Free Things To Do in Acadia National Park

If you have extra time, Schoodic Point is worthwhile.
  • #1
    Things to do in Acadia National Park
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    #1 in Acadia National Park
    Hiking, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND
    Hiking, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND

    Standing about 1,530 feet in height, Cadillac Mountain wins a lot of superlatives. Not only is it the tallest mountain in the park, but it's the tallest mountain on the North Atlantic seaboard and the first point of the United States to greet the rising sun's rays from Oct. 6 to March 7. Whether you hike up the Cadillac Summit Loop Trail or drive up the 3.5-mile narrow access road, go early. As the only attraction in the park that can be reached by car, Cadillac tends to draw crowds. If you do arrive by car, you should drive slowly, especially as the roadside cliffs get steep. Along the road, you'll find several small observation areas: take advantage of those before you reach the top, where the crowds and tour buses congregate.

    Recent travelers said a trip to Acadia isn't complete without a stop at Cadillac Mountain, but caution the area gets crowded, especially on the weekends. For the ultimate vistas, set your alarm clock and try to catch a sunrise here; visitors assure it is a spectacular sight to see. If you're visiting during the winter months, you'll have to take the Cadillac Summit Loop Trail; the park closes down the access road for the winter season. Pack blankets and hold on to your hats, too, as it gets chillier as you ascend.

  • #3
    Jordan Pond
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    #3 in Acadia National Park
    Parks and Gardens, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Parks and Gardens, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Both the Jordan Pond Nature Trail (an easy stroll through the evergreens) and the Jordan Pond Shore Trail (a more difficult trek along the rocky coast) spill out to the picturesque and pleasant respite that is Jordan Pond. Pick your poison (or trail) and at the end, you'll find crystal-clear waters that mirror the surrounding mountains. The nearby Jordan Pond House Restaurant serves soups, lobster rolls and its signature popovers and tea.

    Recent travelers were equally impressed with the restaurant's menu as they were with the spectacular scenery. However, visitors warned that the restaurant can get very crowded around lunchtime, especially in the summer. If you don't want to wait long for a table, try getting to the restaurant early (reviewers rave about the afternoon tea). If you can time your hike accordingly, you can also make reservations by calling the restaurant. And when you're ready to move on, the Perpendicular Trail, as well as a handful of other paths, start in the area. If you'd rather drive here than hike, the restaurant has its own parking lot, but space is limited. You can access the parking lot from Park Loop Road. You can also arrive via the Island Explorer shuttle (Route No. 5 stops here).

  • #4
    Schoodic Point
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    #4 in Acadia National Park
    Beaches, Hiking, Natural Wonders, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Beaches, Hiking, Natural Wonders, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    As the only portion of Acadia National Park that's actually located on the mainland, Schoodic Point isn't as easily accessible as some of the park's other major attractions. But that's precisely why recent travelers found this area so special. Much like Mount Desert Island, Schoodic Point is composed of a craggy shoreline, granite headlands and spruce-fir forests. But unlike the island, its removed location lends a feeling of secluded intimacy.

    Located about an hour's drive northeast from Bar Harbor, Schoodic Point is perhaps best known for the crashing surf that explodes against its rocks. When you're not admiring the waves, look to the west for incredible views of Cadillac Mountain. Most visitors parked themselves in a beach chair to take in the nature show, but there are plenty of other things to do here as well. There are four hiking trails; the Schoodic Head Trail, Anvil Trail and East Trail lead hikers through spruce-fir forests to pine woodlands at the top of Schoodic Head. The less-strenuous Alder Trail guides visitors through a shrubland. And if your legs need a break from all the climbing, take a seat at the Frazer Point picnic area. It offers tables, fire rings, water fountains, restrooms and a dock.

  • #5
    Sand Beach
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    #5 in Acadia National Park
    Beaches, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Beaches, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Sand Beach is filled with sharp shells and its water rarely warms above 55 degrees Fahrenheit. But still, this is the most popular of the park's two beaches. Why? Because the views here are outstanding. Sandwiched between two walls of solid pink granite and surrounded by towering evergreens, the 290-yard-long shoreline is not your average beach. When you're not admiring the views from the shore, consider hiking up the Great Head Trail for an even better vantage point. This trail, which starts at the eastern end of the beach (the opposite end of the parking lot), has ascending granite steps that start at the base of the cliffs. Once you get to the top, you'll enjoy spectacular views of the beach and be able to spot The Beehive, a mountain that attracts experienced hikers.

    You'll find this beach off Park Loop Road, just south of the east entrance pay station. If you choose to drive, you'll find a parking lot off Park Loop Road (this is also where the beach's changing rooms are located). The free Island Explorer shuttle also makes frequent stops at the beach. Because of its location off of Park Loop Road, Sand Beach is only open from mid-April to December. 

  • #6
    Carriage Roads
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    #6 in Acadia National Park
    Recreation, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Recreation, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Carriage Roads are a 57-mile long network of paved paths created and funded by John D. Rockefeller Jr. from 1913 to 1940. Over the course of the 27-year project, Rockefeller hand-designed the paths to highlight the best scenery the park had to offer, circling around Jordan Pond, Eagle Lake and Mount Desert Island. After a weatherproofing and modernizing project in the 1990s, the Carriage Roads reopened to the public. The roads (which are off-limits to motor vehicles) are great for those on bikes, horses and inline skaters who want to explore some of Acadia's more rustic areas. And unlike most other trails, the Carriage Roads are kept open in the winter to be repurposed as skiing and snowshoeing routes.

    Recent travelers said a walk or bike ride here really allows visitors to appreciate the beauty of Acadia, and many highly recommended planning a fall visit just to see the spectacular foliage. If you want to avoid the crowds, reviewers suggest you get on the road early and try to visit on a weekday.

  • #7
    Precipice Trail
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    #7 in Acadia National Park
    Hiking, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Hiking, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Precipice Trail is one of the most rewarding hikes in the park, as long as you have the guts to attempt it. The challenging, 2-mile round-trip path has visitors scrambling up the side of Champlain Mountain by iron rungs and ladders fixed to exposed cliffs, all for a scenic summit and unparalleled view of Sand Beach.

    Unfortunately, the trail isn't one size fits all. Recent travelers warned that the trail isn't well-suited for visitors who are afraid of heights. If you're on the fence about whether you're up for the challenge, reviewers suggest you try tackling Beehive Trail first. And to avoid being stuck behind fellow hikers, start your climb early.   

  • #8
    Thunder Hole
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    #8 in Acadia National Park
    Natural Wonders, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND
    Natural Wonders, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND

    A raucous natural phenomenon, this semi-submerged cave booms an hour or two before high tide. Waves fill the cave in such a way that the slapping is as loud as a thunderstorm — hence the name — and water can spray as far as 40 feet, so wear a poncho if you want to stay dry.

    To catch the big boom, there's an element of luck, as well as timing. Recent travelers said the best time to visit is when the tides are changing. Visitors also warned that it can be difficult for those with mobility issues to enjoy since the rocks can be uneven. If you venture outside of the viewing platform (which includes a railing and level steps), walk carefully; the rocks will likely be wet and slippery. When you're not admiring the spectacular show, take a moment to take in the views: you'll spot Schoodic Peninsula in the distance, Sand Beach to left and Otter Cliff to the east.

  • #9
    Otter Cliff
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    #9 in Acadia National Park
    Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND
    Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND

    Another classic stop along the Park Loop Road, Otter Cliff is a giant 110-foot-high granite precipice with one of the most breathtaking ocean views on the East Coast. Be careful not to fall off the ledge as you burst through the spruce trees that cap the precipice. In the summer, you'll see adventurous rock climbers scrambling up the granite and whale pods spouting off the shore. In the fall, giant flocks of ducks gather here in the waves before migrating south for the winter.

    Recent visitors said a stop here is a must for the views alone, but they also point out that Otter Cliff is much less crowded than some of the park's other top spots like Sand Beach. Travelers said the lack of crowds made their visit especially peaceful. Otter Cliff is accessible via Park Loop Road year-round and is located less than a mile south of Thunder Hole. If you're already at Sand Beach, you can take the Ocean Path all the way to Otter Cliff (and pass Thunder Hole along the way). You can also get here via the free Island Explorer shuttle (Route No. 3, Sand Beach/Blackwoods, stops here). If you decide to drive, you'll find a parking area across the road from the cliff. From there, you'll see granite steps leading to the cliffside.

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