Bermuda Travel Guide

Caribbean  #10 in Best Island Vacations
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Courtesy of John Zakszewska / EyeEm/Getty Images

Getting Around Bermuda

The best way to get around Bermuda is on a bus. You don't have the option of renting a car here and maneuvering with a motorbike could be fun or deadly, depending on your perspective. Electric two-seater vehicles called Twizys are yet another option and easier to master than a scooter (not to mention safer). The taxis pretty much have a monopoly on getting you from L.F. Wade International Airport (BDA) to your hotel, but this budget-killing option for sightseeing is not your best bet. Fortunately, the buses are reliable and affordable, and stop at many of the top attractions

Many people arrive at Bermuda on a cruise ship. Most dock in Hamilton, though there are a few that anchor around Historic St. George or the Royal Navy Dockyard. Taxi drivers are waiting at all the docks to show you around, or you could rent a motorbike to move around on your own.

Taxi The downside to taking a taxi is the cost. Cab fares are either per hour (starting around $50 for one to four passengers) or per distance traveled (for one to four passengers, the meter starts around $8 and each additional mile costs about $3.50). Be aware that fares go up at least 25 percent between midnight and 6 a.m. and on Sundays and holidays. Cabs are abundant since visitors aren't allowed to have cars. Feel free to hail one off the street. If you don't spot one, ask around; hotels, restaurants and shop owners are more than willing to call one for you. Drivers are fairly knowledgeable about their islands and many of them will give you a tour if you ask. The taxis displaying a blue flag are specifically for tours.
Moped and Scooter

It usually takes travelers only one trip in the expensive taxis, sitting in ridiculous traffic, to realize that there isn't a comfortable way of moving around Bermuda. Driving a motorbike might seem scary (roads are narrow and there are one too many blind curves), but this is a fairly affordable option if you dislike the cabs. You don't need a license to drive, but you must be at least 18 years old, wear a helmet and remember: Bermudians drive on the left. There are several companies around the islands that offer rentals; cost of the bikes start anywhere from $30 to $55 for the first day. Most shops also offer pedal bikes for rent. The Bermuda Railway trail is a popular route for cyclists because it doesn't allow motorists. 

Bus

You'll find the island-wide bus an excellent, hassle-free way to see Bermuda. Routes travel from the outer parishes to Hamilton and back, with stops at several tourist sites along the way. And they're color-coded; to go to Hamilton, look out for the pink pole. If you want to leave Hamilton, stand by the blue one. Fare is determined by zone; the main island has 14 zones and it costs $3.50 to travel up to three zones or $5 for more than three. You'll need to carry exact change or use tokens, which are sold at bus terminals and hotels. You can get a bus schedule in the visitor centers. For more information, visit the Government of Bermuda website.

Ferry

To sit back and enjoy the Bermudian sights, you can take a ferry. The government-operated boats cross the Great Sound between Hamilton and Sandys parish and from Hamilton to the parishes of Paget and Warwick (where a lot of the hotels are located). There are four color-coded routes to choose from, all of which depart from the ferry terminal on Front Street in Hamilton. A one-way fare varies from $2.75 to $5, depending on age and route. And just like the bus, you'll need to pay with exact change. SeaExpress operates Bermuda's ferries.

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