Bryce Canyon National Park Travel Guide

USA  #1 in Best Places to Visit in Utah

Bryce Canyon National Park Area Map

Neighborhoods

Most injuries at Bryce Canyon National Park can be avoided with proper preparation, common sense and caution. This includes wearing the right shoes, being aware of the weather and driving safely. As in any natural setting, never approach, startle or feed any wild animal you encounter. Observe wildlife from a distance, and make sure you have food contained properly.

Though lightning is a year-round danger at Bryce Canyon National Park, it's especially threatening during the summer. Storms are most common in July, August and September but can happen any time of the year. To avoid injury, follow the NPS' rule of thumb, "when thunder roars, go indoors." If you can hear thunder, that means lightning is within 10 miles. Head to a shelter or your vehicle immediately.

As on any hike, preparation is key. Wear hiking boots with good ankle support and "lug" traction; don't climb or slide on cliffs (it's dangerous, as well as illegal); bring plenty of water to avert dehydration; stay on the trail; and wear a hat and sunscreen. It's important to remember that at Bryce Canyon National Park, elevations can reach 9,115 feet and Bryce's trails start at the top, which means you'll be returning uphill. 

Explore More of Bryce Canyon National Park

If you make a purchase from our site, we may earn a commission. This does not affect the quality or independence of our editorial content.