Gettysburg Travel Guide

USA  #3 in Best Places to Visit in Pennsylvania
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Getting Around Gettysburg

The best way to get around Gettysburg is to walk or drive. Though you'll need to use other modes of transportation to get to town, Gettysburg's small size makes it easy to walk to and from any point downtown. Parking is also readily available should you choose to drive. To visit nearby wineries, ski slopes, the Eisenhower National Historic Site or Sachs Covered Bridge, plan on bringing or renting a car. Other options include riding bikes or Freedom Transit trolleys, but their fees make them more expensive than walking or relying on your own set of wheels.

Several airports – including those servicing Baltimore and Washington, D.C. – sit within 100 miles of Gettysburg, but the closest is Harrisburg International Airport (MDT), which is located about 45 miles northeast in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Visitors can also get to town by taking an Amtrak train from New York City, Baltimore, Philadelphia or Washington, D.C., to Harrisburg. Once in Harrisburg, travelers will need to rent a car or hop on a rabbittransit bus to reach Gettysburg. Keep in mind, the latter only operates at select times on weekdays.

On Foot

The bulk of Gettysburg's restaurants, shops and inns and bed-and-breakfasts sit within walking distance of one another in the heart of town. The downtown area is also where you'll find the Gettysburg College campus and most of Gettysburg's top attractions. Most must-see sights, including the Gettysburg Museum of History, the Jennie Wade House and the Shriver House Museum, can be found on or just off of Baltimore Street, one of Gettysburg's main thoroughfares. The street runs from the town center's roundabout to the northern tip of Gettysburg National Military Park. To reach farther locales, such as Sachs Covered Bridge and brand-affiliated hotels consider getting around by car.

By Bike

Another way to get from point A to point B on warmer days is to rent a bicycle. Standard bike hires are available from central shops like Gettysburg Bicycle and GettysBike Tours for $10 per hour or $30 per day. All rental rates include use of helmets, and some also cover use of bike locks or dog trailers. Electric bikes, tandem bicycles and other specialty bikes may be available to rent as well. Gettysburg cycling trail maps can be found on Under Armour's website.

Biking is permitted in Gettysburg National Military Park, but travelers must abide by the park's cycling rules. Bikes are only allowed on paved park roads and avenues; when on walking trails, visitors must hop off and walk their bicycles. Bikes cannot be ridden inside the park's Soldiers' National Cemetery. Bicycle racks are available at various points throughout the park, including at the cemetery's entrances and by the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center. To learn more about riding bikes in Gettysburg National Military Park, visitors can check out the park's Bicycling Information page.

Trolley

Gettysburg's rabbittransit public transportation network includes the Freedom Transit trolley service. However, the trolley charges $1 per ride (or $3 per day), per person and offers limited stops and departure times. The most popular route for tourists is the Lincoln Line, which travels between downtown's Gettysburg Transit Center and the Eisenhower Hotel & Conference Center. This trolley line includes a stop at Gettysburg National Military Park's visitor center, but all other central attractions are easier to reach on foot. Plus, trolleys only run once every hour between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily from December to May, though additional service is available in the summer.

Car

If your Gettysburg vacation will include visits to destinations like regional wineries, Liberty Mountain Resort or the Eisenhower National Historic Site, opt to drive a car. Harrisburg International Airport is home to multiple car rental agencies, and an Enterprise outpost can be found within walking distance of Amtrak's Harrisburg station. Or, visitors can use ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft.

Most Gettysburg businesses and attractions offer on-site parking. What's more, travelers can park in lots on Middle and Stratton streets. Additional public parking spaces are available at the Gettysburg Heritage Center and the Racehorse Alley Parking Garage. Visit the Gettysburg Borough Parking Department website for more information about local parking options.

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