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Free Things To Do in Halifax

If you have extra time, Halifax Seaport Farmers Market is worthwhile.
  • #1
    Things to do in Halifax
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    #1 in Halifax
    Free, Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Towering over downtown Halifax, the Citadel is a testament to the city's military past. Four forts have occupied this hilltop since 1749, when Edward Cornwallis, a career British military officer, governed the region; the fort that stands today dates back to 1856. Visitors can wander the Citadel's corridors and learn about Halifax's involvement in major wars, such as the American Revolution, the American Civil War and both World Wars. The on-site Army Museum offers a closer look at the fortress's history. And to truly feel what it was like to be on the hill back in its heyday, make sure to come at lunchtime, when reenactors of the Royal Artillery fire the traditional noon gun.

    You can also interact with members of the 78th Highland Regiment. From May through October, these kilted reenactors offer free guided tours of the fort and provide insight on what it was like to be a soldier there. You can even learn to shoot a 19th-century rifle from one of these reenactors (for an extra fee and age restrictions apply).  

  • #2
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    #2 in Halifax
    Free, Parks and Gardens
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Parks and Gardens
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Public Gardens are a living testament to the Victorian era. And visitors welcome the respite from the urban atmosphere. Opened in 1867, this 16-acre public space – marked by an ornate metal entryway – houses manicured flower beds, quiet walkways, a picturesque gazebo and plenty of perfect picnic spots. Locals and visitors alike praise the beauty of the park and love the peace and quiet it affords in the center of the city. The Friends of the Public Gardens runs tours of the grounds during the summer. You can request a tour and check out the latest tour schedule on the organization's website.

    The Halifax Public Gardens are open every day from 7 a.m. to one hour before sunset. Admission is free. The gardens are located kitty-corner to the Citadel. You can learn more about the Public Gardens by perusing the park's website.

  • #3
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    #3 in Halifax
    Free, Shopping
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Shopping
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Halifax Seaport Farmers Market was established by royal decree in 1750, a year after the establishment of Halifax itself. Since opening nearly 300 years ago, travelers and locals alike visit the market to purchase a range of goods. On any given day, you'll be able to buy soaps, baked treats, fresh produce, fish, jewelry and more from nearly 100 vendors. Recent visitors praised the variety of wares (both food and craft) sold by dealers and say it is a great place to browse.

    The market, located on the waterfront, is about a 5-minute walk from the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21. It's is free to peruse the market. Hours vary slightly by season, but you can expect to visit the market from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays to Fridays, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sundays. The market is open on Mondays in the summer only. For more information, visit the market’s website.

  • #5
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    #5 in Halifax
    Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Sitting across the harbor from Halifax is Dartmouth, a small town that has been around since 1750. There are two primary reasons to visit this Nova Scotia town (aside from the scenic ferry ride across the harbor): First, to enjoy its natural landscape; and second, to take in its history. Known as "The City of Lakes," Dartmouth is peppered with 23 individual ponds, many of which are surrounded by public parkland and ideal for a picnic. Another scenic stomping ground is the Shubenacadie Canal, which was created in the early 1800s to connect Halifax Harbor to Shubenacadie Grand Lake and ultimately the Bay of Fundy near Nova Scotia's interior. Walking on the trails at Shubenacadie is a favorite activity for many recent visitors.

    You should spend an hour or two exploring Dartmouth's harbor, where you'll find a cluster of historic buildings that now house cute shops and cozy restaurants. The area is also adorned with different street art, making the walk between boutiques and eateries entertaining.

  • #6
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    #6 in Halifax
    Entertainment and Nightlife, Free, Cafes, Neighborhood/Area, Shopping, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND
    Entertainment and Nightlife, Free, Cafes, Neighborhood/Area, Shopping, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Halifax Waterfront is a fun-filled spot packed with cafes, restaurants, bars, breweries, shops, historic ships, boat tours and ferries, not to mention buskers and other street performers. It's here that you'll find many of the area's top attractions that detail the city's maritime heritage and its history as an immigration port. It's also a premier photo stop for tourists, as the harbor views, art installations and bright orange hammocks (ideal for relaxing) provide the perfect backdrop. Recent visitors say the lively area is fun to explore, with lots of options for eating, drinking and shopping, in addition to simply enjoying the views.

    The waterfront is located downtown. It has a 2-mile boardwalk that can be accessed at various points. The boardwalk is accessible 24/7, but individual shops and restaurants have their own hours of operation. Visit the Discover Halifax website for more information.

  • #7
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    #7 in Halifax
    Free, Churches/Religious Sites
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Churches/Religious Sites
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Founded in 1749 by Britain's King George II, St. Paul's is Canada's oldest Anglican Church. The building may look simple at first, but architecture buffs and historians alike will appreciate its construction. The church was modeled after London's St. Peter's Church (designed in 1722). Its timbers were imported from Maine and other building materials, like the church's bricks, were made near Halifax.

    If you want an in-depth explanation of the church's history, attend one of its tours. Guided tours operate from mid-June through October and self-guided tours run from November through June. Tour times vary by season, so call ahead to determine times. Recent visitors expressed that the church offers an interesting piece of history and say the church staff are friendly and informative.

  • #11
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    #11 in Halifax
    Beaches, Free, Hiking, Recreation
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Beaches, Free, Hiking, Recreation
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Less than an hour by car from downtown Halifax, Crystal Crescent Beach offers an outdoor respite from the busy city. Here, you'll find three white sand beaches, a 6-mile hiking trail and ample opportunities to view wildlife. In the distance, you can see the Sambro Island Lighthouse, which was built in 1759.

    Recent visitors praised the beauty of the beach and the clear waters. They also noted that one of the beaches welcomes nude bathing.  

  • #12
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    #12 in Halifax
    Free, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    This three-story Palladian building in the heart of Halifax has provided a meeting ground for the Nova Scotia House of Assembly since 1819, making it the oldest house of government in Canada and a National Historic Site. Although it still functions as a legislative building, visitors are welcome to a self-guided tour of the building year-round or to partake in a guided tour in July or August. You can also sit in on assembly gatherings (when they're in session).

    Recent visitors recommended taking the guided tour, which they say are informative and comprehensive.

  • #13
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    #13 in Halifax
    Free, Parks and Gardens, Monuments and Memorials
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Parks and Gardens, Monuments and Memorials
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND

    After learning about the tragic sinking of the Titanic at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, visit this cemetery for another sobering experience. The Fairview Lawn Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 100 victims of the Titanic disaster and visitors regularly come to pay their respects. In addition to the Titanic victims, you can also visit the graves of fallen soldiers from both World War I and II. Recent travelers said visiting the graveyard is a must-do for those interested in the Titanic. They also remark it is a somber, albeit interesting experience, and that there are plenty of signs to find the Titanic victims' graves.

    The cemetery is located about 3 miles northwest of downtown Halifax. You can get to the cemetery by car or taking the Nos. 2, 4, 29 or 90 bus routes. Grounds are open daily for free visitation from sunrise to sunset. Check out the cemetery's official website for more details.

  • #14
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    #14 in Halifax
    Museums, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND
    Museums, Free
    TYPE
    Less than 1 hour
    TIME TO SPEND

    Visiting a library while on vacation may not be at the top of your list, but hear us out about this branch. In addition to its enormous collection of books and other materials, the Halifax Central Library has a sunroom gallery space, two cafes, a rooftop patio, video game systems and a 300-seat auditorium that hosts shows, author talks and lectures.

    Visitors can explore several exhibits at the library. Informative installations detail the First Nations culture, African Nova Scotians and the region's Acadian and French heritage. There's also a room with books solely about Nova Scotia history as well as a display that honors Halifax County's military men and women who have lost their lives since World War I. Many past visitors were in awe of the contemporary space and especially enjoyed the on-site cafes.

  • View all Photos
    Museums, Free, Sports
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Museums, Free, Sports
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

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  • View all Photos
    Free, Wineries/Breweries
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Wineries/Breweries
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

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  • View all Photos
    Free, Recreation
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Recreation
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

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