Halifax Travel Guide

Canada  #13 in Best Family Vacations in Canada
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Free Things To Do in Halifax

If you have extra time, Halifax Public Gardens is worthwhile.
  • #1
    Things to do in Halifax
    View all Photos
    #1 in Halifax
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    To sample historic Halifax, spend a few hours perusing the Historic Properties. Overlooking the harbor from its city-center locale, this neighborhood retains much of its original fin-de-siècle architecture. The historic buildings that once acted as shipping warehouses and privateers' headquarters now house the lively Harbourside Market, numerous boutiques, souvenir shops and several rowdy brewpubs.

    The majority of Halifax visitors and residents say that this quaint neighborhood is a must-see for first-time tourists. As one Yelp.com user (a Halifax resident) says: "It's a total tourist draw, and one of the places that is absolutely required visiting … whether you're 'from here' or 'from away.'"

  • #2
    Citadel National Historic Site
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    #2 in Halifax
    Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Towering over downtown Halifax, the Citadel is a testament to the city's military past. Four forts have occupied this hilltop since 1749, when British Colonel Edward Cornwallis governed the region; the fort that stands today dates back to 1856. Visitors can wander the Citadel's corridors and learn about Halifax's involvement in major wars, such as the American Revolution, the American Civil War and both World Wars. The on-site Army Museum offers a closer look at the fortress' history. And to truly feel what it was like to be on the hill back in its heyday, make sure to come at lunchtime, when re-enactors of the Royal Artillery fire the traditional noon gun.

    You can also interact with members of the 78th Highland Regiment. During the summer months, these kilted re-enactors offer free guided tours of the fort and provide insight on what it was like to be a soldier there. According to one TripAdvisor user, "Visitors can ask questions, inspect military kit, and see short enactments of the firing of canons and military parades."

  • #3
    Halifax Public Gardens
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    #3 in Halifax
    Parks and Gardens, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Parks and Gardens, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Public Gardens are a living testament to the Victorian era. And visitors welcome the respite from the urban atmosphere. Established in 1867, this two-acre public space -- marked by an ornate metal entryway -- houses manicured flower beds, quiet walkways, a picturesque gazebo and plenty of perfect picnic spots. As one TripAdvisor user describes them: "The Public Gardens is simply gorgeous, colorful, peaceful and beautiful … Oddly when you enter, it is peaceful and blocks all the noise from outside."

    The Halifax Public Gardens are open every day from 8 a.m. to dusk during the spring, summer and fall; the gardens close between December and mid-April. Admission is free. You can learn more about the Public Gardens by perusing the park's website.

  • #5
    Dartmouth
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    #5 in Halifax
    Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Sitting across the harbor from Halifax is Dartmouth, a small town that has been around since 1750. There are two primary reasons to visit this Nova Scotia town (aside from the scenic ferry ride across the harbor): First, to enjoy its natural landscape; and second, to take in its history. Known as "The City of Lakes," Dartmouth is peppered with 23 individual ponds, many of which are surrounded by public parkland and ideal for a picnic. Another scenic stomping ground is the Shubenacadie Canal, which was created in the early 1800s to connect Halifax Harbor to Shubenacadie Grand Lake and ultimately the Bay of Fundy near Nova Scotia's interior.

    You should can spend an hour or two exploring Dartmouth's harbor, where you'll find a cluster of historic buildings that now house cute shops and cozy restaurants.

  • #6
    St. Paul's Church
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    #6 in Halifax
    Churches/Religious Sites, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Churches/Religious Sites, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Founded in 1749 by Britain's King George II, St. Paul's is Canada's oldest Protestant church. The building may look simple at first, but architecture buffs and historians alike will appreciate its construction. The church was modeled after London's St. Peter's Church (designed in 1722), and the heavy wooden beams were brought north from Boston when Massachusetts was still a British colony. However, according to one TripAdvisor user, "The most interesting parts were a piece of metal embedded in the wall … and the spooky broken window in the shape of a silhouette -- both remnants of the famous Halifax explosion."

    St. Paul's is located just around the corner from the Province House in downtown Halifax. The church is open to visitors Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and free guided tours are available (though you should call ahead to determine the tour times). Admission is free. To learn more about St. Paul's, visit the church's website.

  • #9
    Province House
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    #9 in Halifax
    Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    This three-story Palladian building in the heart of Halifax has provided a meeting ground for the Nova Scotia House of Assembly since 1819, making it the oldest house of government in Canada and a National Historic Site. Although it still functions as a legislative building, visitors are welcome to take a guided tour. One TripAdvisor user strongly recommends this because "It's free and doesn't take long, they do a good job explaining the customs and history of the government in the region." You can also obtain a visitors pass, which will allow you to sit in on assembly gatherings (when they're in session).

    The Province House is sandwiched between the Citadel and the Maritime Museum. Visitors are welcome every weekday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. (hours are extended to include weekends between July and August), and admission is free. For more information, check out the Nova Scotia Legislature's website.

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