Myrtle Beach Travel Guide

USA  #6 in Best Cheap Family Vacations
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Courtesy of Kelly Verdeck Photography/Getty Images

Getting Around Myrtle Beach

The best way to get around Myrtle Beach is by car. If you're going to spend most of your time around the beachfront hotels, you can easily manage on foot. However, a car is handy for traveling farther distances since the bus is your only public transportation option. Car rental agencies are located just beyond the baggage claim area in Myrtle Beach International Airport (MYR), and plenty of taxis and hotel shuttle services are lined up outside the terminal.

Car A car is the easiest way to get around Myrtle Beach, especially if you plan to explore beyond the waterfront. Parking meters are installed and in effect for the season from March 1 through Oct. 31 every year. Hourly rates, which vary depending on the location of the meter, range from $1.50 to $2. Some operate on a three-hour maximum, but most allow drivers to park in one spot all day for a flat rate that ranges from $8 to $10. A charming touch is that if you find you don't have correct change for the meter, you can call one of the city's parking ambassadors for help (843-626-7275) and someone will come to you with the amount requested. Many meters will take credit cards, though, or you can pay from your phone with the ParkMobile smartphone app. For longer stays, a seven-day visitor's parking pass is available for $30.
On Foot

Most vacationers have no problem getting around Myrtle Beach and the surrounding area on foot. Although cost-efficient (and healthy) it can be limiting if you want to explore beyond the shore.

Taxi

Although taxis aren't too difficult to find, they can get somewhat pricey. When you get inside, make sure you specify whether you're going to Myrtle Beach or North Myrtle Beach. The border is invisible, but both towns have different ways of numbering and naming their streets. A miscommunication over your final destination could end up costing you. Uber and Lyft also operate in Myrtle Beach if you prefer to use the smartphone apps (which can help eliminate confusion about where you're headed).

Bus

The area does offer 10 bus routes that run west of Myrtle Beach in the town of Conway and south to the town of Georgetown. There are multiple routes that run up and down the Grand Strand with stops along Ocean Boulevard and Kings Highway. A one-way fare costs $1.50 with reduced rates for seniors and students. Unlimited day passes can be purchased for $5. For more information on specific routes and fare options, visit the Coast RTA website.

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