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2-day Itinerary in Paris

Explore the best things to do in Paris in 2 days based on recommendations from local experts.

Day 1

  • 1
    #5
    Sacred Heart Basilica of Montmartre (Sacre-Coeur)
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    #5 in Paris
    Churches/Religious Sites, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Churches/Religious Sites, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Rising high above Paris, the Sacré-Coeur (meaning "Sacred Heart") looks more like a white castle than a basilica  but that's what it is. Towering over the eclectic neighborhood of Montmartre (once a hangout for Paris' bohemian crowd), this Roman-Byzantine masterpiece is easily recognized by its ornate ivory domes. As blanched as it may appear on the outside, the basilica's interior is a sight worth beholding: The ceilings glitter with France's largest mosaic, which depicts Jesus rising alongside the Virgin Mary and Joan of Arc. 

    You'll also likely be left in awe with the panoramic views found from atop the Sacré-Coeur's outdoor staircase. But for an even better photo op, climb all 300 steps to the top of the dome. The dome is accessible to visitors every day from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. from May to September, and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from October to April. Mass is held multiple times a day every day. 

    While the Sacre-Coeur does receive its fair share of crowds, travelers say braving the many tourists was worth it. Visitors found the church to be magnificent and although some admit it's tempting to just stay outside and admire the views of Paris, travelers strongly recommend exploring the church's stunning interiors. Travelers also suggested making a trek during sunset and if you stick around long enough, you'll be able to see the Eiffel Tower's sparkling lights illuminate the skyline. Though if you can't fit that in your schedule, carve out some time to explore the charming Montmartre neighborhood, especially the Place du Tertre, a public square.

    You can reach the Sacré-Coeur from the Anvers metro stop on line 2; from there, you can ride the funicular up the mountain to the basilica. But to truly experience Montmartre's magical atmosphere, climb the neighborhood's winding stone, located next to the funicular. The Sacré-Cœur opens its doors to visitors every day from 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., and admission is free. Visit the basilica's website for more information.

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    25-30 minutes by metro; 15-20 minutes by car
  • 2
    #8
    Palais Garnier - Opera National de Paris
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    #8 in Paris
    Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    A masterpiece of architectural opulence, the Opéra Garnier  also known as the Palais Garnier  still exudes the same enigmatic atmosphere it radiated in the late 1800s. This palpable sense of intrigue and mystery that permeates the opera is due in part to its awe-inspiring Old World interiors as well as Gaston Leroux, the author of "Phantom of the Opera," for which the Garnier served as inspiration. Leroux claimed the phantom was indeed real, successfully incorporating real life opera occurrences (such as the chandelier falling and killing a bystander) into his fiction. The Garnier's lack of a robust historical record, as well as Leroux's writing talents, have left many wondering if there really was a dweller that lurked beneath the opera. Staff have claimed otherwise, but say with the opera's very real underground lake, it's easy to see how the story could be so convincing. Without Napoleon III, who was responsible for commissioning the opera, Leroux's tale would have never come to fruition. 

    The best way to fully experience the Palais Garnier is by purchasing a ballet or opera ticket. Remember to book your tickets several months in advance, as performances are highly coveted. If you won't be in town for a performance or aren't up for forking over the oftentimes high price of a performance, you can explore the building's magnificent interiors on your own. Travelers who did so found the insides of the building to be so grand they couldn't believe their eyes. Visitors said every part of the Palais Garnier, down to the smallest of nooks and crannies, was completely stunning, with some comparing it to the kind of extravagance you'd find in Versailles. Because of the opera's popularity, you're likely going to have to wait in line to get tickets as well as enter the attraction.

    The Palais Garnier is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. but closes at 1 p.m. on days of matinee performances. Unguided admission costs 11 euros ($12.31) for adults and 7 euros ($7.83) for students and those younger than 25. The opera also offers guided tours for 15.50 euros ($17.47) for adults and with discounted rates for children and students. Guided English tours occur every day at 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. You can also purchase an audio guide for 5 euros (around $5.60). The Opéra Garnier stands just north of the Louvre and can be reached from the Opéra (métro lines 3, 7 and 8) and Chaussée d'Antin - La Fayette (lines 7 and 9) stations. You'll also find bookstores and gift shops, as well as a restaurant on-site. For more information on general visits, check out the Palais Garnier website

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    15-20 minutes by metro; 10-15 minutes by car
  • 3
    #15
    Champs-Élysées
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    #15 in Paris
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Musician Joe Dassin once sang "Il y a tout ce que vous voulez aux Champs-Élysées," which translates to "There's everything you could want along the Champs-Élysées." And he's right. Paris' most famous boulevard  stretching more than a mile from the glittering obelisk at Place de la Concorde to the foot of the Arc de Triomphe   is a shopper's mecca. Along its wide, tree-lined sidewalks, you'll find such luxury stores as Louis Vuitton and Hugo Boss rubbing elbows with less-pricey establishments like Adidas and Gap.

    While the Champs-Élysées is no doubt a shopping paradise, recent travelers noticed the price tags at most stores are can be pretty high. And the more affordable options are constantly swamped with people. The Champs-Élysées itself is no different. Because this is such a famous street in Paris, expect there to be crowds galore, both during the day and the nighttime. Still, many travelers enjoyed taking in the Champs-Élysées' bustling atmosphere and observing both locals and tourists come and go. Some recent visitors said a trip to the Champs-Élysées is not complete without a stop at Laduree, the city's famous macaron shop. 

    You're welcome to cruise the Champs-Élysées at any time, day or night, and window-shopping won't cost you a penny. Métro stations Concorde (lines 1, 8 and 12), Champs-Élysées - Clemenceau (lines 1 and 13) and Franklin D. Roosevelt (lines 1 and 9) are nearest to the bustling avenue. The street also leads to such sites as the Grand Palais and the Petit Palais (both exhibition spaces), among other attractions. To learn more about what to see and do, visit the Champs-Élysées website.

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    15-20 minute walk
  • 4
    #10
    Arc de Triomphe
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    #10 in Paris
    Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Situated at the western end of the Champs-Élysées, the towering Arc de Triomphe was commissioned by Napoléon to honor the Grande Armee during the Napoleonic Wars. The arch, which is the largest of its kind in the world, is adorned with several impressive, intricately carved sculptures. Underneath the Arch travelers will find the names of the battles fought during the first French Republic and Napolean's Empire as well as generals who fought in them. Travelers will also find the famous tomb of The Unknown Soldier. The unknown soldier currently buried there is meant to represent all the unidentified or unaccounted for soldiers who lost their lives during World War I. The flame that was lit when the soldier was laid to rest has not extinguished since it was initially lit in the 1920s, and is rekindled every night at 6:30 p.m. by a member of the armed services. 

    Aside from admiring the arch, visitors can climb to the top and take in the Parisian panorama. Most visitors are wowed by the immense size of the structure and recommend ascending to the top for the spectacular Paris views. Visitors caution that you'll have to wait in line to get to the top and the climb, which is made up of hundreds of stairs, can be a serious workout. Others strongly cautioned against trying to cross the street to get to the Arc. Instead, take the underground tunnel near the metro that leads directly to the base of the structure. 

    The interior of the arch and the viewing deck is open every day from 10 a.m. to 10:30 or 11 p.m., depending on the season. You can admire the arch from the outside for free, but climbing to the top will cost 8 euros ($8.94) for anyone older than 17. Children 17 years and younger can enter the arch for free and those between the ages of 18 and 25 can enjoy a discounted entry fee of 5 euros ($5.59). The closest metro station is Charles de Gaulle Étoile, which service lines 1, 2 and 6 as well as RER A. To learn more, visit the Arc de Triomphe website.

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    20 minutes by metro; 10-15 minutes by car
  • 5
    #3
    Eiffel Tower (Tour Eiffel)
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    #3 in Paris
    Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Designed and constructed for the 1889 Exposition Universelle (the World's Fair), the Eiffel Tower was always meant to be a temporary structure, but it skirted demolition talks twice. The first time, at the beginning of the 1900s, the tower was kept around because of its transmission talents. Gustav Eiffel, chief architect of the Eiffel Tower, had a variety of scientific experiments tested on the tower with the hope that any discoveries would help prolong its lifespan. One of these included a wireless transmissions test, which the tower passed with flying colors. During World War I, the Eiffel Tower's transmission capabilities enabled it to intercept communications from enemies as well as relay intel to troops on the ground. The second time the Eiffel Tower was almost destroyed was during the German occupation of France during World War II. Hitler planned to get rid of the tower, but never ended up going through with his plan. 

    Today, the Eiffel Tower is still used for communication transmissions but is chiefly regarded for its grandeur. If you can believe it, many Parisians initially found this architectural marvel to be nothing more than an eyesore. Regardless, the Eiffel Tower today stands as one of the most visited tourist attractions in the world. Visitors can walk up to the first floor of the Eiffel Tower or take the elevator all the way up to the top, where they'll be treated with vast panoramic views of the city. While some recent visitors complain of long lines  especially during the summer  you can bypass the wait by booking your tickets online at the Eiffel Tower's website. And though some travelers aren't crazy about the price to get to the top, many agree that the views are worth it. Visitors also strongly recommend making an additional trek at night. That's because every hour on the hour, thousands of flickering light bulbs make the Eiffel Tower sparkle, leaving tourists in complete awe. 

    You can reach Paris' most famous landmark from the Bir-Hakeim, Trocadéro or Ecole Militaire métro stops, serviced by lines 6, 8 and 9. The Eiffel Tower, located on the western side of the city, is open every day of the year, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. from mid-June to early September, and from 9:30 a.m. to 11: 45 p.m. the rest of the year. Admission prices vary depending on how high you wish to go and how you choose to get there (elevator or stairs). Most visitors choose to ride the elevator to the top, which costs 17 euros (about $19) for adults, 14.50 euros (roughly $16.27) for visitors between the ages of 12 and 24, and 8 euros (about $9) for children ages 4 to 11. Access to the stairs and the elevator to the second floor is cheaper. For more information, visit the landmark's website.

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    25 minutes by train; 10-15 minutes by car
  • 6
    #1
    Notre-Dame Cathedral (Cathedrale de Notre Dame de Paris)
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    #1 in Paris
    Churches/Religious Sites, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Churches/Religious Sites, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Note that the cathedral sustained significant damage as a result of a fire on April 15, 2019. Its wooden roof and spire collapsed during the fire. It remains closed until further notice.

    Like the Eiffel Tower, the Notre-Dame Cathedral is seen as a Parisian icon. Located right along the picturesque River Seine, the Notre-Dame Cathedral is considered a Gothic masterpiece and is often regarded as one of the best Gothic cathedrals of its kind in the world. Construction of the famous cathedral started in the late 10th century and final touches weren't made until nearly 200 years later. And once you get an eyeful of the cathedral yourself, you'll start to understand why it took so long.

    The architectural details of the Notre-Dame are intricate and become more abundant the closer you get. The front entrance boasts carefully carved statues that integrate seamlessly into its stone facade. The portal of judgment entrance, in particular, is just one example of this awe-inspiring architectural style. The back end of the cathedral is just as spectacularly detailed, featuring an ornate flying buttress just begging to be photographed. Inside, travelers will find sky-high gilded ceilings and stained-glass windows throughout. If you want to do more than just meander around, visitors have the option of climbing the cathedral's 387 steps for top-notch views of the city. Or you can venture below to the crypt to view ancient remains. 

    Travelers found the architecture of the Notre-Dame to be amazing both inside and out. Those who ventured to the top of the cathedral thoroughly enjoyed the views, but were annoyed at how little time they were afforded by cathedral officials. Because going to the top of the Notre-Dame is such a popular activity, and there's so little space at the top, the cathedral restricts the number of people at the top as well as how long they can be there. Also, be prepared to wait. The attraction sees upward of 13 million visitors per year, so unless you come really early in the morning or late at night, there will likely be throngs of people at the front plaza and long lines to the top of the cathedral. 

    Notre Dame is open Monday through Friday from 7:45 a.m. to 6:45 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 6:45 p.m. There is no entrance fee, even if you want to climb to the top of the cathedral. The towers are open daily April through September from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. October through March. You'll find Notre Dame Cathedral in the heart of the city; subsequently, the Cité stop on the metro's line 4 is the nearest. To learn more, visit Notre Dame's website.

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Day 2

  • 1
    #4
    Le Marais
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    #4 in Paris
    Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Straddling the 3ème and 4ème arrondissements (districts), Le Marais is one of Paris' oldest and coolest districts  so cool, in fact, that French writer Victor Hugo (author of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" and "Les Misérables") called it home. With all of its cobblestone streets, stately stone architecture and tucked away courtyards, it's easy to feel as if you're strolling through medieval Paris. Back in the day, Le Marais housed some notable French royalty. King Henry IV was the one responsible for the construction of the Place des Vosges, Paris' oldest square. And Louis XIV called this neighborhood home for a while until he decided to move his family and court to Versailles. Much of Le Marais also survived the destruction made during the French Revolution. 

    Despite the Old-World French atmosphere, the neighborhood has played host to multiple cultures throughout its lifetime. Since the 13th century, Le Marais has been the city's Jewish quarter. The quarter's history can be most felt along rue des Rosiers, which feature some old-school delis and bakeries. Today, Le Marais is the epicenter of the city's gay community, with chic boutiques and vibrant nightlife options outnumbering traditional Jewish establishments. Le Marais is also known for its delectable falafel (especially at L’As du Fallafel), shopping and numerous art galleries and museums. Here you can find the Centre Pompidou, the National Archives of France, the Musée Picasso and Musée des Arts et Métiers, the oldest science museum in Europe. In addition to the neighborhood's collection of boutiques, Le Marais is known for its numerous vintage shops and specialty stores, including papeteries. Antique hunters will get a load of good finds at the Village Saint-Paul while foodies will delight in a visit to the Marché des Enfants Rouges, Paris' oldest market. 

    Visitors say the best (and easiest) way to experience Le Marais is to simply walk around. Strolling through its lively streets, travelers couldn't help but fall in love with Le Marais and all its offerings. Le Marais' vast amenities, including its many delectable eateries, kept travelers entertained (and satiated) for hours on end while the neighborhood's beautiful architecture left many in awe. This, in combination with the district's overall fun atmosphere, made the neighborhood a choice place to stay for travelers while in Paris (the area is known for its swanky hotels). If you're interested in learning more about Le Marais' rich history, consider joining a walking tour. DiscoverWalks offers free walking tours around the neighborhood every day at 2:30 p.m. 

    Le Marais is free to explore all hours of the day, however individual business may have their own entry fees or hours. The best starting point to explore Le Marais is from Saint-Paul, which services line 1. The Sully-Morland (line 7) and Rambuteau (line 11) metro stops also border Le Marais. 

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    25 minute walk; 10 minutes by car
  • 2
    #2
    Musée du Louvre
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    #2 in Paris
    Museums
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Museums
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    If you only had time to visit one museum in Paris, it should undoubtedly be the Musée du Louvre. That's because the Louvre is not only widely considered to be one of the best art museums in Europe, but one of the best in the world as well. The museum first opened its doors in 1793 and features a grand total of 35,000 works of art. Here you can get up close to a variety of art from different time periods and cultures. The Louvre features everything from Egyptian mummy tombs to ancient Grecian sculptures (including the renowned Winged Victory of Smothrace and curvaceous Venus de Milo). There are also thousands of paintings to peruse as well. Masterpieces such as "Liberty of Leading the People" by Eugene Delacroix, "The Raft of Medusa" by Théodore Géricault and Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa," the museum's biggest star, can be found here. You can even get a glimpse of Napolean the Third's old apartment digs. Though you don't necessarily have to visit the apartments to get a taste of what it was like to be a royal. Before it was a museum, the Louvre served as a royal residence for a number of French powers, including Louis XIV. It was only sometime after Louis XIV left the Louvre in favor of Versailles that the Louvre began to transform into a museum.

    With such a robust art collection, the Louvre has earned the title as the most visited museum in the world (upward of 9 million per year). While visitors agree it is no doubt a must-visit attraction, with the majority more than impressed with the museum's offerings, the crowds can be a major turn off (especially around the glass-enclosed "Mona Lisa"). Not to the point where travelers are willing to skip the Louvre altogether, but they stress going at a time where there will be fewer people (not the middle of the day on a weekend). Others said the sheer enormity of the museum can be overwhelming, so much so that covering the entire 650,000 square feet of gallery space in a day is close to impossible. The best strategy is to pick what you want to see ahead of time and grab a map so you can easily locate those works of art. Otherwise, you could easily end up spending hours wandering around waiting to run into the must-sees and miss them.

    The museum is open Mondays, Thursdays and weekends from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. The Louvre is closed on Tuesdays. Admission costs 15 euros ($16.80) for adults and is free for visitors 17 years old and younger. If you're visiting between October and March, save some money by planning your visit for the first Sunday of the month when admission is free. The museum is located in the city center and has its own metro stop, Louvre-Rivoli on line 1. To learn more, visit the Louvre's website.

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    15 minute walk
  • 3
    #6
    Musée d'Orsay
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    #6 in Paris
    Museums
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Museums
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Housed in a former railway station along the Left Bank, the Musée d'Orsay is regarded for its rich collection of impressionist works. You'll see paintings by French artists like Degas, Monet, Cezanne, and Van Gogh, among many, many others. The museum also houses a number of sculptures, as well as photography and even furniture displays. And if you climb to the museum's top balcony, you can catch a breathtaking view of the Sacré-Coeur Basilica through the museum's massive transparent clock.

    Although the extensive Louvre may appear to get most of the Parisian limelight, recent travelers seem to enjoy the Musée d'Orsay more. Travelers say the museum is much more manageable than the often overwhelming Louvre and note that there are also significantly fewer crowds here. Many visitors confidently report that you can easily get through this museum in a few hours. As for the art, travelers loved the museum's colorful collection of paintings as well as the building itself, with many calling the Belle Epoque architecture of the d'Orsay a work of art on its own.

    Even though the Musée d'Orsay doesn't see nearly as many visitors as the Louvre (the annual visitors is a little more than 2 million while the Louvre is 9 million), don't expect to be greeted with an empty museum. There will still likely be a fair amount of tourists to share space with. General admission here is 12 euros (around $14) per person. Doors are open every day from 9:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. except Mondays. On Thursdays, the museum stays open till 9:45 p.m. and if you come in from 6 p.m. onward, you'll receive a discounted 9 euro ($10.08) ticket. You can also snag this discount every other day if you decide to visit the museum past 4:30 p.m. You can reach the Musée d'Orsay by hopping off the Assemblee Nationale Metro stop, line 12. For more information about the museum, visit the Musée d'Orsay website

    ...Read More »
    15 minutes by metro
  • 4
    #9
    Luxembourg Gardens (Jardin du Luxembourg)
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    #9 in Paris
    Parks and Gardens, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Parks and Gardens, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    A warm-weather oasis that offers the simplest of pleasures, the Luxembourg Gardens provide ample green space (61 acres) for sun-soaking and people-watching, plus there are plenty of activities to keep kids entertained. When the city bustle becomes too overwhelming, meander around the paths and formal gardens, or just relax with a picnic. Kids can float sailboats at the Grand Basin, ride ponies or take a spin on the merry-go-round, or catch a puppet show at the on-site Theatre des Marionettes. Adults might delight in the on-site Musee du Luxembourg, the first French museum that was opened to the public. Though with 106 sculptures to its name, including a replica of the Statue of Liberty, the Luxembourg Gardens could easily be considered an open-air museum itself.

    The Gardens also have sports courts, including basketball and baseball, but travelers say the best way to unwind here is to just kick back and admire the surrounding scenery. You'll find Luxembourg Gardens in the 6th arrondissement (neighborhood), just a short walk from both the Odéon (line 4 and 10) and Notre-Dame des Champs (line 12) metro stops. You can tour the garden for free but there is a fee to enter the Musee du Luxembourg. For more information, visit the Paris Visitors Bureau website.

    ...Read More »

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