National Museum of American Jewish History

#8 in Best Things To Do in Philadelphia
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G. Widman/Visit Philadelphia™

Key Info

101 S Independence Mall E

Price & Hours

$15 for adults; $13 for kids 13-21; free for k...
Tues-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-5:30...

Details

Museums Type
2 hours to Half Day Time to Spend

scorecard

  • 4.0Value
  • 4.5Facilities
  • 4.0Atmosphere

The National Museum of American Jewish History aims to connect Jews to their heritage and inspire people of all backgrounds to appreciate the diversity of the Jewish experience. More than 30,000 artifacts illustrate immigration, worship, hard work, community and family life. The first floor features the "Only in America Gallery/Hall of Fame," which showcases the accomplishments of 18 well-known Jewish Americans. The other three floors cover Jewish history dating back to 1654. 

Recent visitors highly recommend a stop here, and appreciated the fact that the museum focuses on the entire history of Jews, rather than just the Holocaust.

The museum is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. There is a PHLASH stop nearby, as well as several subway lines, including the Market-Frankford line. Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for kids ages 13 to 21 and is free for children 12 and younger. Tickets are valid for consecutive two-day admission. Free public tours are normally offered every day at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Space is limited, so request a tour badge from the admissions desk to reserve a tour spot. For more information, visit the museum's website.

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#1 Liberty Bell Center

Opposite Independence Hall, you'll find the Liberty Bell Center in Independence National Historical Park. Now residing in a huge glass gazebo, this 2,080-pound piece of history was once mounted in the belfry of Independence Hall. It was used to mark important historic events, most notably at the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence. Historians believe the first crack developed in the early 1840s. Metal workers were tasked with repairing the bell in anticipation of George Washington's birthday in 1846. The repair was unsuccessful and the bell ceased to chime ever again.

Despite the long lines, recent visitors called this attraction a must-see for all Americans. They also suggested planning your visit first thing in the morning during the week.

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