Metropol Parasol picture1 of 2
Metropol Parasol2 of 2
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Key Info

Plaza de la Encarnación, s/n, 41003

Details

Cafes, Entertainment and Nightlife, Monuments and Memorials, Shopping, Sightseeing Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
4.2

scorecard

  • 4.0Value
  • 4.5Facilities
  • 5.0Atmosphere

If you're anywhere near Plaza de la Encarnación (in the northwest corner of El Centro), the Metropol Parasol is impossible to miss. Its towering presence was constructed in 2011, making it the newest major attraction in the city and purportedly the largest wooden structure in the world. The architectural wonder serves as a gathering place and features a farmers market, restaurants, an archeological museum, winding rooftop walkways and an open-air public square. Locals fondly refer to the lattice structure as "las setas" or "the mushrooms" given its quirky shape. 

For 5 euros (about $5.50), visitors can ride the elevator to the top of the wooden structure, walk along the elevated paths and enjoy one complimentary drink at the bar, Sevilla Gastropol. Most visitors recommended paying for access to the top, and said that the views are beautiful both during the day and at night. The walkways open daily beginning at 9:30 a.m., and close at 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and at 11:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. For more information, visit the Metropol Parasol's website.

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#1 Real Alcázar

The Spanish monarchy doesn't quite boast the worldwide clout of the British monarchy, but royalty is royalty, right? Take the chance to step into sovereignty when you enter the Real Alcázar palace and gardens. The palace was built in the seventh century and it still occasionally hosts the royal family when they visit Seville. While the original structure dates back to the Middle Ages, the entire palace has been heavily influenced by different architectural and cultural styles, ranging from Gothic to Baroque. The intricate architectural design is known as mudéjar – a Muslim and Christian artistic fusion unique to Andalusia. Explore on your own or use an audio tour to guide you through the luxurious rooms of the palace like the Salón de Embajadores (Hall of Ambassadors) and the Patio de las Doncellas (Patio of the Maidens). But to gain access to the Cuarto Real Alto (the Upper Royal Quarters), you'll need to pay for a guided tour.

Make sure to budget enough time to admire the details. Past visitors recommended examining every aspect of this grand residence of kings – even the architecture on the ceiling is striking. This UNESCO World Heritage Site is surrounded by gardens that are also worth seeing.

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