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2-day Itinerary in Tokyo

Explore the best things to do in Paris in 2 days based on recommendations from local experts.

Day 1

  • 1
    #1
    Tokyo National Museum
    View all Photos
    #1 in Tokyo
    Museums
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Museums
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    If you're looking to learn a little (or a lot) about Japan's history, the Tokyo National Museum is the place to go. This museum is one of the country's most expansive, housing about 116,000 pieces of art and artifacts that cover the longest recorded history of Japan. Strolling through the halls of its numerous buildings, you'll spot relics such as samurai armor and swords (a traveler favorite), delicate pottery, kimonos, calligraphy, paintings, and much more, some of which are designated as national treasures and Important Cultural Properties by the Japanese government. In addition to artifacts from Japan's history, you'll also find pieces from all across the Asian continent, including Buddhist scrolls that date all the way back to 607. 

    Travelers were impressed with all that the Tokyo National Museum has to offer. Even some who admitted they aren't museum people enjoyed the variety of unique artifacts on display. Travelers appreciated that the museum featured English translations, something that some visitors noticed other Tokyo top attractions lacked (think the Ghibli Museum). Museum goers also say that there so much to see in the Tokyo National Museum that you probably need an entire day if you want to get through everything. If you don't have enough time to do this (or just don't want to) the best thing to do is get a map of the museum beforehand and pick what you want to do before you venture in. 

    The Tokyo National Museum is easily reached on the metro. The closest metro stops are Uguisudani and the Ueno metro station. Be sure to enjoy the fresh air of the surrounding Ueno Park before or after you visit the museum. The park also features a zoo, the National Museum of Nature and Science, the National Museum of Western Art, a scenic pond equipped with row boats and plenty of verdant green space. Admission to the museum costs 620 yen (about $6) for adults. The museum welcomes visitors from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day except Mondays, when it is closed. For more information, check out the Tokyo National Museum's website.

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    10 minutes by car; 25 minutes by metro
  • 2
    #3
    Sensoji Temple
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    #3 in Tokyo
    Churches/Religious Sites, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Churches/Religious Sites, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The oldest religious site in Tokyo is also its most visited. The Sensoji Temple sees about 30 million annual visitors and dates all the way back to year 628. Despite its claim to antiquity, however, the structures that currently stand are relatively new reconstructions of previous edifices (during World War II, nearly the entire temple was razed). The Sensoji Temple is dedicated to Asakusa Kannon, the Buddhist god of mercy and happiness. According to legend, two fishermen struck gold and found a statue of the god while fishing on the Sumida River. The Sensoji shrine is dedicated to this lucky catch as well as features a small homage to the fisherman who caught the statue. Unfortunately, while here, you won't be able to see the actual statue. It is there, but it isn't on public display. It has never been. Either way, Buddhists and interested tourists alike flock to this attraction with the hopes that being in the presence of Kannon's healing powers will rub off on them. After you've properly toured Sensoji, take some time to check out the shops that line Nakamise Dori, which you'll find on the way to the temple. 

    The majority of travelers enjoyed their experience at the Sensoji Temple. Visitors found the temple to be beautiful and enjoyed admiring its grand stature and intricate architectural details. The only complaint among travelers was with the attraction and all the activity surrounding it; Sensoji can get so crowded that it can be difficult to be able to simply admire the attraction. If you don't want to share space with throngs of tourists, visitors suggest coming early morning or late at night. 

    The Sensoji Temple is easily accessed via the Asakusa Station. Although the temple grounds remain open 24/7, the main hall welcomes visitors daily from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. From October to March, the hall opens a bit later at 6:30 a.m. Admission is free. For more information, check out the Tokyo Tourism Board's website

    ...Read More »
    20 minutes by car
  • 3
    #4
    Imperial Palace
    View all Photos
    #4 in Tokyo
    Castles/Palaces, Monuments and Memorials, Parks and Gardens, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Castles/Palaces, Monuments and Memorials, Parks and Gardens, Free
    TYPE
    2 hours to Half Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    You'd think the Imperial Palace would be mobbed with tourists, but it's not. You can credit the lack of crowds to an application policy, which limits the number of visitors. That's because the Imperial Palace is home to the Emperor of Japan and the royal family. And before that, it was the residence for some of Japan's most important figures, including Emperor Meiji (credited for modernizing Japan) and rulers during the Edo Period (the time period before Japan was modernized by Meiji). Because of its significant importance in Japanese society, admittance to the site is hard to get (you have to put in your application several weeks in advance) and access inside the actual palace is even fewer and far between.

    As such, most travelers suggest skipping the application entirely (those who went on the tour were disappointed with how little of the palace is open to visitors) and admiring the compound from afar. Visitors also say the East Gardens, which are part of the Imperial Palace complex, are much more of a sight to see. This flourishing green space has plenty of shady spots and open fields, perfect for relaxing. And during cherry blossom season, these gardens are a choice spot for locals looking to enjoy the seasonal foliage. 

    Visitors are free to explore the East Gardens anytime between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The park closes a half hour earlier during the winter and a half hour later during the summer. Tours of the palace are given at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and they usually last one hour and fifteen minutes. The closest metro station is Nijubashi-mae station. For more information and to apply for a visit, check out the Imperial Household Agency's website

    ...Read More »
    15 minutes by car
  • 4
    #2
    Meiji Shrine
    View all Photos
    #2 in Tokyo
    Churches/Religious Sites, Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Churches/Religious Sites, Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing, Free
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Meiji Shrine is a Shinto (Japan's original religion) shrine dedicated to Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. Japanese history credits Meiji for modernizing Japan by incorporating Western principles into Japanese society, including adopting a cabinet system into government. After the emperor's death in 1912 and that of his consort in 1914, the Japanese commemorated their contributions with the Meiji Shrine. While the buildings are certainly worth visiting, the surrounding forest (considered part of the vast Yoyogi Park) is a sight to see as well. That's because 100,000 of the trees standing were all donated by Japanese people from around the country as a thank you to emperor.

    While at such a holy site, take time to divulge in traditional rituals. When entering the shrine, you'll first meet the Torii, or the shrine's large archway. It's traditional to bow once entering then again when you leave. To foreigners, the temizuya may appear to be a drinking fountain, but it's actually a cleansing station where visitors have the opportunity to purify themselves with holy water. It's common to wash your hands and rinse your mouth out, but don't drink the water or allow the wooden dippers provided to touch your lips. When approaching the main shrine, it's customary to pay your respects by bowing twice, then clapping your hands twice, make a wish and bow once again. Carrying out such respects are optional, the rules of the shrine are not. Don't photograph the interior of the buildings; don't eat, drink or smoke unless you're in designated areas.

    Travelers say that while this is not the most striking of temples they have seen, it is by far the most peaceful and welcoming. Visitors appreciated that the shrine encouraged foreigners to participate in traditional rituals and prayer service (with instructions posted on how to join in within the attraction). Even if you don't choose to participate in prayer, reviewers say a visit here is worth it to observe the Shinto practices, as it better helped them understand Japanese culture as a whole. The Meiji Shrine and its surrounding forests are also incredibly serene, with many visitors saying it was the perfect place for a much-needed break from the concrete jungle. While here, visitors encourage travelers to write down a personal prayer or wish and tie it to the prayer wall (as pictured) to commemorate your experience at the shrine. 

    The closest metro stations to the Meiji Shrine are the Harajuku station and the Kita-Sando Station. The shrine is free to visit and welcomes visitors from sunrise to sunset every day, but the individual building maintains varied hours. For more information, check out the Meiji Shrine's website.

    ...Read More »
    20 minutes by car; 40 minutes by metro
  • 5
    Sightseeing, Tours, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Sightseeing, Tours, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Even if you're not a sushi connoisseur, the Tsukiji Market offers an unforgettable experience. It is the largest and oldest fish market in the world, handling upward of 1,800 tons of seafood per day. Ships arrive in the wee hours of the morning, and by 5 a.m., the famous tuna auctions have already commenced with wholesalers bidding for good-looking specimens. Unfortunately, due to the increased number of tourists, these exciting auctions are closed to the public, except for a small viewing area open from 5 to 6:15 a.m. While we encourage early risers to queue for this small space, the rest of the market, which always welcomes visitors, is sufficient to whet your appetite.

    Nearly 500 different types of seafood are sold here, ranging from basics (like tuna) to the exotic, as well as the high priced (a box of uni, or the edible part of a sea urchin, is $250 per box). If all the excitement and bartering starts to make you a little hungry, don't hesitate to grab a bite here. There are numerous sushi stalls and tiny restaurants in the market (Sushi Dai and Daiwa Sushi are popular spots) that serve fish at their freshest. But if you aren't a much of a seafood fan, no matter. There's still something for you here. The market also sells loads of produce (about 270 different types) and features a few ready-made meal stalls that aren't all seafood-based, including Mosuke Dango, where you'll find sweet dumplings. There's also Indo Curry Nakaei, which serves curry. Plus, the nearby outer market offers a series of streets filled to the brim with restaurants and cafes that feature a vast array of delectable cuisines. 

    Travelers had mixed reviews on the famed Tsukiji Market. If you're not at all a seafood person, or you really don't like overstimulating and/or crowded places, visitors say this is not the attraction for you. Travelers say this market is huge and very busy all hours of the day. Those who do enjoy seafood will no doubt be in awe of the vast array of fresh and delectable seafood options available, so much so that patrons strongly suggest coming hungry as you'll probably end up eating more than you planned. Travelers also delighted in the market's lack of a pungent, fishy smell. 

    The Tsukiji Market is located in the center of Tokyo in the Chuo neighborhood. If you're taking public transit, you should get off at the Tsukiji or Tsukijisjijo metro stations that surround the market. The market is open for business every day of the week except Sunday and Wednesday; for the most activity, visit in the morning. If you want to watch the live tuna auction, you must get tickets at the Fish Information Center (located by the Kachidoki Bridge entrance) at 4:30 a.m. when they become available. Spots are on a first come, first serve basis and only 120 people are permitted to witness the tuna auction each day. Hours are 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Because the market is so dense and busy, children are not permitted. For more information, take a gander at this helpful website about the market.

    ...Read More »
    15 minute walk
  • 6
    #8
    Ginza
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    Ginza
    free
    #8 in Tokyo
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    New York has Fifth Avenue, London has Oxford Street, Paris has the Champs-Élysées and Tokyo has Ginza. The neighborhood is a shopper's paradise, housing all types of storefronts from affordable, big-name retailers such as H&M and Zara to upscale design houses such as Dior, Armani and Cartier. You can also find loads of specialty stores selling traditional items, such as kimonos, incense and chopsticks, as well as more unconventional finds, such as stores dedicated to buttons, model trains and even charcoal-infused beauty products. You can also find a plethora of Hello Kitty products at the Sanrio flagship store located here, as well as all the toys your kid's (or your) heart desires at the massive Hakuhinkan Toy Park. 

    If you're not much of a shopper, Ginza still offers loads in the way of things to do. The neighborhood is also an arts hub, housing more than 200 galleries to its name. There are also plenty of theaters as well. If you're looking to catch a traditional kabuki performance while in Tokyo, Kabuki-za is considered one of the city's best. And if you're a foodie, you'll probably end up in Ginza anyway. That's because the neighborhood houses lots of Michelin-rated restaurants, including the three-star Ginza Kojyu, which is also considered one of the 50 best restaurants in the world.

    Travelers say the best way to soak up the Ginza atmosphere is to forgo the overpriced goods in favor of a tasty meal. While the neighborhood no doubt caters to the elite, affordable dining options are available, just keep an eye out for ramen stalls and food trucks that are located throughout the area.

    Ginza is centrally located and easy to reach. Multiple subway stations service this neighborhood, but the Ginza Station will place you in the heart of the action. And when you've exhausted your credit card, head to the nearby Imperial Palace East Gardens for some peace and quiet. For more information on Ginza, visit the Tokyo Tourism Board's website

    ...Read More »

Day 2

  • 1
    #5
    Odaiba
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    Odaiba
    free
    #5 in Tokyo
    Museums, Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND
    Museums, Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    Half Day to Full Day
    TIME TO SPEND

    Envision a mini Atlantis rising out of the water, conveniently right next to downtown Tokyo. That's Odaiba. This neighborhood/mini-island situated on the Tokyo Bay is a hub of entertainment, eateries and eye-catching architecture, including the futuristic-looking Fuji Television building. Some of the area's top attractions include the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation and the relaxing Odaiba Seaside Park, which comes equipped with its own beach and Tokyo's own Statue of Liberty. There's also a host of amusement parks the kids will no doubt enjoy. In Tokyo Leisure Land in Palette Town, you'll also find go-karts in Mega Web and one of the world's largest Ferris wheels.

    There's also the Legoland Discovery Center. DiverCity Tokyo Plaza and Decks Tokyo Beach facility offers lots in the way of dining and shopping in addition to entertainment options. Meanwhile, adults will likely be drawn to the Ooedo-Onsen-Monogatari, a natural hot springs theme park where visitors can walk around in traditional yukata robes while dipping their toes in one of the 13 varieties of baths available. But, aside from the many distractions on Odaiba, the gorgeous views across the water have most eyes turned back toward downtown. And at night, the Rainbow Bridge electrifies the glittering skyline with glorious colors.

    Travelers say there is so much to do in Odaiba, that you're going to need more than a day to properly see everything. The best way to tackle this tourist-friendly area is to pick out what you want to do ahead of time. Travelers definitely recommended the shopping, as a number of brand name stores can be found here. Travelers also suggested sticking around for views of the twinkling city lights at night, which can be seen from multiple points of Odaiba. Visitors do note that while there is a beach at Odaiba Seaside Park, swimming isn't advised.

    You can visit this amenity-packed island anytime, any day, though individual businesses have their own hours. There are multiple metro stops that service Odaiba, including Kokusai-tenjijo-seimon and Odaiba-kaihinkoen stations. For more information about Odaiba, visit the Tokyo Tourism Board website

    ...Read More »
    15 minute walk
  • 2
    #6
    National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation
    View all Photos
    #6 in Tokyo
    Museums
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Museums
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation, commonly referred to as the Miraikan, attests to Tokyo's entrepreneurial spirit and penchant for science and technological innovation. This high-tech museum features a plethora of exciting interactive displays spread across three themed permanent exhibits. In Explore The Frontiers, visitors can learn about space exploration by stepping into a model of the International Space Station, which has been autographed by astronauts who spent time there, including Buzz Aldrin. There's also Discover Your Earth, where you'll find a large LED paneled Earth sculpture, as well as the robotics-heavy Create Your Future exhibit. Make sure you get an eyeful of Honda's impressive ASIMO robot while here. ASIMO has opposable thumbs, can run, and even kick a soccer ball (as it did with President Obama in his 2014 visit to the museum). Kids will particularly enjoy the displays as they can touch, climb on and play with many of them. The museum also features science workshops for kids, talks from researchers and the GAIA 3-D Home Theater. 

    Despite its draw, many travelers offered mixed reviews of the museum. Some reported feeling like kids, amazed at the vast amount of things to learn and do, while other adults said the museum is best suited for children. Some visitors also found the exhibits to be lacking, saying the information provided was very basic (the jury is out on whether its language for kids to understand or a translation issue). Travelers did recommend hanging out for the ASIMO demonstration, though some others who attended said the show was boring and the robot not as up-to-date as they hoped. Those who did bring their kids in tow said they had a ball.

    The museum welcomes visitors from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Monday. On Odaiba, you can easily walk to the museum from the Fune-no Kagakukan and the Telecom Center metro stations. Admission for adults costs 620 yen (roughly $6) for adults and 210 yen (about $2) for youth 18 years old and younger. Note: On Saturday, individuals 18 and younger get in for free. For more information, check out the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation's website.

    ...Read More »
    15 minutes by car
  • 3
    #12
    Tokyo Sea Life Park
    View all Photos
    #12 in Tokyo
    Zoos and Aquariums
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Zoos and Aquariums
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Across the water from Tokyo Disneyland, the Tokyo Sea Life Park provides educational fun for the whole family. This well-designed aquarium features numerous habitats that mimic bodies of water from around the world, like the Caribbean Sea, Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean and Tokyo's very own Tokyo Bay. Here you can find a variety of fish from those regions, including Tokyo's famous bluefin tuna. Travelers will also run into penguins during their visit, puffins and turtles, to name a few. There's also a petting area where patrons can get up close and personal and touch sting rays and bamboo sharks. 

    Travelers found the aquarium to be informative and were impressed with the variety of sea life housed here. Travelers loved the penguin exhibit as well as the touching station and recommended a visit if you have kids in tow or are staying near Disneyland and looking to pass some time. The views of Tokyo Bay, which surround the aquarium, were a nice bonus for visiting travelers (the entrance to the Sea Life Park is a large glass dome situated on the edge of the water). 

    The Tokyo Sea Life Park is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with last admission at 4 p.m. It is also closed on Wednesdays. Admission costs 700 yen (about $6) for adults and 250 yen (around $2) for kids. Located in Kasai Rinkai Park, the aquarium is only a five-minute walk from the JR Kasai Rinkai Koen metro station. For more details, check out the Tokyo Sea Life Park's website.

    ...Read More »
    20-25 minutes by car; 40 minutes by metro
  • 4
    #11
    Akihabara
    View all Photos
    #11 in Tokyo
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Shopping, Free, Neighborhood/Area
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    Akihabara is nirvana for techies. Tokyo's premier electronics district, which is also referred to as "Akiba," has gadgets of all kinds found in booths on side streets and main street mega department stores. You'll spot the latest technology on the shelves, which will probably put your equipment to shame. And if you're in the market for hard-to-find bibs or bobs, you're likely to find that here too. If you're unsure where to start, stop at the larger-than-life Yodobashi department store (often billed as the largest electronics store in the world) or stroll along the neighborhood's main street, Chuo Dori, which becomes car-free on Sundays. In addition to being an electronics hub, Akihabara also caters to serious gamers and anime lovers. Here, you'll find loads of gaming arcades as well as shops and street stalls selling comics and character figurines. You'll also probably spot a few cosplayers casually walking down the street. 

    While Akihabara is no doubt unique, recent travelers had mixed reviews about the district. Those who expressed interest in anime loved their visit, saying you can't leave Tokyo without experiencing the world Akihabara has to offer for fans. Those without a greater interest in the subject matter enjoyed the buzzing activity and plethora of neon signage that permeates the area but ended up growing bored after a period of time. Some were downright offended by the inappropriate nature of some of the anime culture (think maid cafes), so this area may not be suitable for young children. Visitors solely interested in shopping for electronics felt overwhelmed by the options and recommended researching in advance to maximize your time in the neighborhood. 

    Akihabara sits in central Tokyo and is accessible via the metro. The closest metro stop is Akihabara. Although you can visit the neighborhood anytime and its free to explore, individual stores have their own hours. For more information, check out the Akihabara district's website.

    ...Read More »
    15-20 minutes by car; 35 minutes by metro
  • 5
    #14
    Tokyo Tower
    View all Photos
    #14 in Tokyo
    Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND
    Monuments and Memorials, Sightseeing
    TYPE
    1 to 2 hours
    TIME TO SPEND

    The Japanese remake of the Eiffel Tower serves a predominately practical purpose. The orange and white tower, which rises 1,092 feet into the air, serves as a radio and television broadcasting structure supporting 62 miles of frequencies. The tower also caters to tourists, offering two observation decks, one at 490 feet  (the main observatory) and one at 819 feet (the special observatory). The observation decks offer 360-degree views of Tokyo's sprawling cityscape and come equipped with guides pointing out notable buildings in the skyline. And if you visit on a really clear day, you'll be able to spot Mount Fuji in the distance. The Tokyo Tower also has its own cafe, where patrons can sip tea while admiring the views, as well as Club 333, a music venue that hosts performances daily. And if you're on the hunt for souvenirs, travelers say this is a surprisingly great place to peruse thanks to all the on-site shops.

    Unlike its French counterpart, the best time to visit the Tokyo Tower is at night, according to reviewers. That's because the tower lights up beautifully, and often in multiple colors depending on when you visit. You'll also encounter stunning vistas from atop Tokyo SkyTree, a much taller tower located about 8 miles northwest, but you'll have to combat hordes of fellow tourists. Recent visitors said of the two towers, this one is less crowded.   

    You can find the Tokyo Tower off of the Akabanebashi and Onarimon metro stations. Admission to the main observation deck is 900 yen (around $8) for adults and 350 yen (about $3) for children 4 years old and younger. Tokyo Tower is open from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. For more information, check out the Tokyo Tower's website.

    ...Read More »

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