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Best Things To Do in Whistler

Whistler was made for powder hounds and outdoor enthusiasts. Skiers and snowboarders can carve Whistler Blackcomb, while adrenaline junkies get their heart rates up at the Whistler Sliding Centre. Meanwhile, history buffs and bookworms can enlighten themselves at the Whistler Public Library or the Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre. Whistler is also a popular summertime spot, with plenty of water sports activities at Lost Lake Park and hiking opportunities at locales like Whistler Train Wreck and Brandywine Falls Provincial Park. Plus, Whistler was the home for many events in the 2010 Winter Olympics, and travelers can tour the Olympic Park and Whistler Olympic Plaza in Whistler Village.

How we rank Things to Do.

#1

#1 in Whistler

In Whistler, this is the main event. Hordes of skiers and snowboarders flock to Whistler Blackcomb every year and for good reason – its slopes stretch across more than 8,100 acres of 200-plus trails, offer terrain to accommodate all skill levels and see an annual average snowfall of around 40 feet. Stunt-lovers can practice tricks on the ramps and half pipes in any of the five terrain parks, while less-experienced skiers can glide down one of the 7-mile-long trails that wind across the mountains, which are not as steep as the mountains' more challenging runs.
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Hiking Type
More than Full Day Time to Spend
Whistler Blackcomb
In Whistler, this is the main event. Hordes of skiers and snowboarders flock to Whistler Blackcomb every year and for good reason – its slopes stretch across more than 8,100 acres of 200-plus trails, offer terrain to accommodate all skill levels and see an annual average snowfall of around 40 feet. Stunt-lovers can practice tricks on the ramps and half pipes in any of the five terrain parks, while less-experienced skiers can glide down one of the 7-mile-long trails that wind across the mountains, which are not as steep as the mountains' more challenging runs.
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#2

#2 in Whistler

Free
Part of what makes Whistler such a popular place to visit is the sense of community – and Whistler Village is where it all comes together. Located at the foot of Whistler Blackcomb and home to dozens of lodging choices, the village is a place where visitors and locals alike come to meet and mingle. Pedestrians can saunter along the Village Stroll, which is lined with ski and snowboard shops, or pop in to one of the many restaurants and bars in the area. Another main draw of Whistler Village is Whistler Olympic Plaza, where Olympic and Paralympic mementos sit on display and a playground and art installations pay tribute to the 2010 Winter Games. During the winter, the plaza makes way for an outdoor public ice skating rink; during the summer, the area plays host to a free outdoor concert series.
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Cafes Type
Half Day to Full Day Time to Spend
Whistler Village
Part of what makes Whistler such a popular place to visit is the sense of community – and Whistler Village is where it all comes together. Located at the foot of Whistler Blackcomb and home to dozens of lodging choices, the village is a place where visitors and locals alike come to meet and mingle. Pedestrians can saunter along the Village Stroll, which is lined with ski and snowboard shops, or pop in to one of the many restaurants and bars in the area. Another main draw of Whistler Village is Whistler Olympic Plaza, where Olympic and Paralympic mementos sit on display and a playground and art installations pay tribute to the 2010 Winter Games. During the winter, the plaza makes way for an outdoor public ice skating rink; during the summer, the area plays host to a free outdoor concert series.
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#3

#3 in Whistler

Free
If you're interested in exploring your surroundings but don't want to trek to Brandywine Falls Provincial Park, consider visiting the Valley Trail. This paved, pedestrian-only pathway stretches more than 25 miles. Its convenient location by the Sea-to-Sky Highway makes it easy to reach from Whistler Village, but its lake views and easy-to-traverse boardwalk are what woo active travelers who want to hike, run, bike or rollerblade during the warmer months. Some sections of the trail are also open in winter for fat biking (or mountain biking on snow) and cross-country skiing.
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Hiking Type
2 hours to Half Day Time to Spend
Valley Trail
If you're interested in exploring your surroundings but don't want to trek to Brandywine Falls Provincial Park, consider visiting the Valley Trail. This paved, pedestrian-only pathway stretches more than 25 miles. Its convenient location by the Sea-to-Sky Highway makes it easy to reach from Whistler Village, but its lake views and easy-to-traverse boardwalk are what woo active travelers who want to hike, run, bike or rollerblade during the warmer months. Some sections of the trail are also open in winter for fat biking (or mountain biking on snow) and cross-country skiing.
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#4

#4 in Whistler

Free
Situated on Whistler Blackcomb near Whistler Village, the Whistler Sliding Centre is home to the 2010 Winter Olympics' bobsled, luge and skeleton tracks. Entry to this Olympic venue is free, but if you've got some extra cash and you're an adrenaline junkie, you should try a bobsled or skeleton ride. A ride on the course is sure to get your blood pumping on a chilly winter day. The 4,757-foot-long track with a nearly 500-foot vertical drop whisks you around 10 icy curves and reaches speeds of up to 78 mph, making the Whistler track the fastest in the world.
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Sightseeing Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Whistler Sliding Centre
Situated on Whistler Blackcomb near Whistler Village, the Whistler Sliding Centre is home to the 2010 Winter Olympics' bobsled, luge and skeleton tracks. Entry to this Olympic venue is free, but if you've got some extra cash and you're an adrenaline junkie, you should try a bobsled or skeleton ride. A ride on the course is sure to get your blood pumping on a chilly winter day. The 4,757-foot-long track with a nearly 500-foot vertical drop whisks you around 10 icy curves and reaches speeds of up to 78 mph, making the Whistler track the fastest in the world.
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#5

#5 in Whistler

Free
Just northeast of Whistler Village, Lost Lake Park is an ideal spot for those looking for nearby cross-country skiing in the winter or hiking trails and a beach in the summer. The 525-acre park features 15 miles of trails for Nordic skiers and snowshoers to explore while admiring Whistler Blackcomb in the distance. Warm weather enthusiasts can throw on their bathing suits and pack a cooler with some brews and burgers to grill on one of the on-site barbecues. Canoes, kayaks and stand-up paddleboards are available for rent at nearby Lakeside Park, and the sandy beach and calm lake offer plenty of opportunities for fun in the sun. Nearly 62 miles of hiking and bike trails are also open to the public during the summer months.
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Hiking Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Lost Lake Park
Just northeast of Whistler Village, Lost Lake Park is an ideal spot for those looking for nearby cross-country skiing in the winter or hiking trails and a beach in the summer. The 525-acre park features 15 miles of trails for Nordic skiers and snowshoers to explore while admiring Whistler Blackcomb in the distance. Warm weather enthusiasts can throw on their bathing suits and pack a cooler with some brews and burgers to grill on one of the on-site barbecues. Canoes, kayaks and stand-up paddleboards are available for rent at nearby Lakeside Park, and the sandy beach and calm lake offer plenty of opportunities for fun in the sun. Nearly 62 miles of hiking and bike trails are also open to the public during the summer months.
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#6

#6 in Whistler

Free
Although Whistler is best known for its ski slopes, once the weather warms up, this winter sports haven offers multiple opportunities to get outdoors and explore nature. And one of the area's best places to hike is Brandywine Falls Provincial Park, which sits roughly 10 miles southwest of central Whistler. This park, which is named after its 230-foot waterfall, features multiple trails, including a family-friendly path and one that is a prime spot for seeing red-tailed frogs (a local threatened species). Some trails can also be used for mountain biking or snowshoeing during the winter months.
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Hiking Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Brandywine Falls Provincial Park
Although Whistler is best known for its ski slopes, once the weather warms up, this winter sports haven offers multiple opportunities to get outdoors and explore nature. And one of the area's best places to hike is Brandywine Falls Provincial Park, which sits roughly 10 miles southwest of central Whistler. This park, which is named after its 230-foot waterfall, features multiple trails, including a family-friendly path and one that is a prime spot for seeing red-tailed frogs (a local threatened species). Some trails can also be used for mountain biking or snowshoeing during the winter months.
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#7

#7 in Whistler

Free
One of Whistler's most unique hiking areas is Whistler Train Wreck. As its name implies, this nearly 3-mile-long trail is best known for its train cars, which were moved to the site in 1956 after falling off a nearby track. Local artists have since decorated the cars with colorful graffiti. The path also crosses a suspension bridge and offers views of the Cheakamus River.
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Hiking Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Whistler Train Wreck
One of Whistler's most unique hiking areas is Whistler Train Wreck. As its name implies, this nearly 3-mile-long trail is best known for its train cars, which were moved to the site in 1956 after falling off a nearby track. Local artists have since decorated the cars with colorful graffiti. The path also crosses a suspension bridge and offers views of the Cheakamus River.
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#8

#8 in Whistler

This cultural center pays tribute to the region's two First Nations native tribes, the Squamish and Lil'wat nations. Through artwork and interactive exhibits, the Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre is meant to represent the melting pot of the two tribal cultures. Upon entering, visitors are greeted with a song, escorted around the site on a free guided tour and invited to watch a film highlighting the First Nations history and their territory surrounding the cultural center. You'll even be encouraged to immerse yourself in the culture by making traditional crafts. What's more, on-site ambassadors, who are part of the Squamish or Lil'wat nations, will regale you with captivating stories about the legends, ceremonies and songs of their people.
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Museums Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre
This cultural center pays tribute to the region's two First Nations native tribes, the Squamish and Lil'wat nations. Through artwork and interactive exhibits, the Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre is meant to represent the melting pot of the two tribal cultures. Upon entering, visitors are greeted with a song, escorted around the site on a free guided tour and invited to watch a film highlighting the First Nations history and their territory surrounding the cultural center. You'll even be encouraged to immerse yourself in the culture by making traditional crafts. What's more, on-site ambassadors, who are part of the Squamish or Lil'wat nations, will regale you with captivating stories about the legends, ceremonies and songs of their people.
... more
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#9

#9 in Whistler

Free
Pack a picnic and head to Alexander Falls if you want to admire Mother Nature in all her glory. This 141-foot-tall natural landmark northwest of Whistler (about a 15-mile drive from Whistler Village) is a majestic sight. Those looking to relax and drink in the environment can take a seat on one of the picnic tables peppered around the observation deck, while hikers can enjoy the lush forest and massive rock formations on the surrounding Callaghan Valley trails.
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Hiking Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Alexander Falls
Pack a picnic and head to Alexander Falls if you want to admire Mother Nature in all her glory. This 141-foot-tall natural landmark northwest of Whistler (about a 15-mile drive from Whistler Village) is a majestic sight. Those looking to relax and drink in the environment can take a seat on one of the picnic tables peppered around the observation deck, while hikers can enjoy the lush forest and massive rock formations on the surrounding Callaghan Valley trails.
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#10

#10 in Whistler

For a dose of culture, consider checking out the Audain Art Museum. This art museum, which opened in 2016, features nearly 200 works of British Columbian art, including First Nations masks and pieces by artists like Emily Carr and E.J. Hughes.Temporary exhibits about everything from Mexican modernists to geishas are also occasionally offered.
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Museums Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Audain Art Museum
For a dose of culture, consider checking out the Audain Art Museum. This art museum, which opened in 2016, features nearly 200 works of British Columbian art, including First Nations masks and pieces by artists like Emily Carr and E.J. Hughes.Temporary exhibits about everything from Mexican modernists to geishas are also occasionally offered.
... more

#11

#11 in Whistler

Free
Fashioned like a wilderness mountain lodge, the Whistler Public Library building fits in perfectly in this ski town. The 12,000-square-foot facility sits between the largest park in Whistler Village and the town's popular pedestrian walkway, the Village Stroll. The library houses more than 49,000 items, ranging from classic fiction and nonfiction works and best-selling books to audiobooks and movies. The venue welcomes more than 250,000 visitors a year thanks to its location and availability to tourists and permanent and seasonal residents. Its Reading Room floods with sunlight and offers ample space to cozy up with a good book. The Whistler library also plays host to a slew of events, such as film screenings, toddler story time, guest lectures and writing workshops.
... more
Sightseeing Type
1 to 2 hours Time to Spend
Whistler Public Library
Fashioned like a wilderness mountain lodge, the Whistler Public Library building fits in perfectly in this ski town. The 12,000-square-foot facility sits between the largest park in Whistler Village and the town's popular pedestrian walkway, the Village Stroll. The library houses more than 49,000 items, ranging from classic fiction and nonfiction works and best-selling books to audiobooks and movies. The venue welcomes more than 250,000 visitors a year thanks to its location and availability to tourists and permanent and seasonal residents. Its Reading Room floods with sunlight and offers ample space to cozy up with a good book. The Whistler library also plays host to a slew of events, such as film screenings, toddler story time, guest lectures and writing workshops.
... more
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