Bears Ears National Monument, Valley of the Gods.

Protected public lands showcasing the country's rich national heritage and ecological diversity are under review. (Getty Images).

President Donald Trump signed an executive order in April that called for the U.S. Department of the Interior to reexamine the designation of 27 national monuments. Many of these treasured places house archeaological splendors and extraordinary flora and fauna. Without the official national monument designation, these cherished sites across the United States could be subject to cattle grazing, logging and drilling, according to #27 Monuments project, headed by journalist and filmmaker Brent Rose, who wants to educate the public about what's going on and to drive people to the Department of the Inerior's comments page to voice their concerns before the fast approaching July 10 deadline. Rose is attempting to visit as many of the sites in the U.S. as possible and document the journey on Instagram.

[See: 5 Inspiring Places to See Before They Disappear.]

With that in mind, maybe it's time to put some of these 27 monuments on your summer travel bucket list. Here's a look at 10 of the national monuments at risk.

Bears Ears National Monument, Utah

Visitors from around the globe flock to Bear Ears National Monument for its spectacular scenery and outdoor recreation. Here, you can enjoy hiking, camping, rock climbing, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, paddling and more active pursuits. What's more, it is a sacred landscape with more than 100,000 Native American cultural sites.

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument boasts well-preserved dinosaur fossils from the late Cretaceous Period, and where you'll find more than 20,000 archaeological sites. Its size, resources and remote character provide extraordinary opportunities for geologists, paleontologists, archaeologists, historians and biologists in scientific research, education and exploration, according to Nicole Gentile, deputy director for the Public Lands Team at the Center for American Progress, a nonpartisan policy institute.

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, Oregon

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is recognized as one of the most biologically diverse areas in the western U.S, and was described by Emily Diamond-Falk, senior associate, communications, U.S. Public Lands for the Pew Charitable Trusts, as an "ecological wonder…whose survival in this region depends upon its continued ecological integrity." Even with the recent expansion, the monument is still smaller than scientists deemed necessary to fully protect its many biological treasures. Whether hiking the legendary Pacific Crest Trail, fishing in the area's clean waters or taking in the views on horseback, the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is treasured by the local community and visitors alike. Plus, the monument also offers an important resource for the local economy. From 2001 (a year after the monument was designated) to 2015, the population grew by 16 percent and jobs grew by 14 percent.

Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, New England

The Northeast Canyons and Seamounts is home to many diverse wildlife species. Scientists have shown it is a hot spot for endangered whales, puffins and fragile, slow-growing corals. Unfortunately, the extraordinary animals and ecosystems in this area are vulnerable to human activity. “Fishing gear can damage or destroy these slow-growing corals and deep-sea animals, and scientists have found evidence in the area of damage fishing gear can cause," Diamond-Falk says.

[See: Going Green: 5 Top Eco-Friendly Trip Ideas.]

Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, Maine

The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument encompasses lands are a natural and cultural wonder designed to preserve an example of northeastern Appalachian woodlands with awe-inspiring scenery and a rich history of the Wabanaki people and the nation's logging industry. Historic figures such as Theodore Roosevelt, John James Audubon and Henry David Thoreau walked these lands and were affected by their sweeping beauty, solitude and biodiversity. Objects of historic and scientific interest can be found across the landscape, and the monument will ensure world-class opportunities for outdoor recreation, such as hiking, paddling, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, hunting and snowmobiling. "The 87,500 acres of the monument represent less than 0.4 percent of the land in Maine, and less than one percent of the largely undeveloped 10 million-acres area known as Maine's North Woods, yet the monument was designed to be large enough to help preserve a piece of the North Woods for all Americans to enjoy," Diamond-Falk says.

Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument, New Mexico

The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument preserves key areas of American and New Mexican history, including the petroglyph-lined canyons of the Sierra de las Uvas Mountains. The national monument also includes landmarks along the Camino Real, 22 miles of the Butterfield Stagecoach Trail, Billy the Kid's Outlaw Rock and training sites for the Apollo Space Program and World War II bomber pilots and crews.

Río Grande del Norte National Monument, New Mexico

The Río Grande del Norte National Monument supports traditional land uses including hunting, wood gathering and grazing. It is also an outdoor lover's paradise, and people from near and far come here to hike, bike, raft and enjoy other recreational pastimes. Thanks to its abundant outdoor recreational opportunities, in the first year after designation, there was a 40 percent increase in visitors. "People and businesses located around national monuments like the Río Grande del Norte National Monument typically reap the benefits of protection. In fact, a recent Headwaters Economics analysis of communities in Taos County found local economies had grown, with per capita income increasing as much as 27 percent," Diamond-Falk says.

Basin and Range National Monument, Nevada

Located in eastern Nevada, Basin and Range is home to prehistoric and pioneer artifacts, along with a unique variety of Mojave, Sonoran and Great Basin vegetation communities and a habitat for at least two dozen threatened and sensitive wildlife species. Plus, the area also features bragging rights for its White River Catseye, a plant species found nowhere outside of Nevada. What's more, the area was home to the Numic-speaking ancestors of the Southern Paiute and Western Shoshone, and includes prehistoric petroglyphs and rock shelters, some dating back over 13,000 years. Visitors come to Basin and Range National Monument to hike, hunt, bird, camp and enjoy off-roading on designated trails, among other pursuits.

Mojave Trails National Monument, California

The Mojave Trails National Monument links Joshua Tree National Park and the Mojave National Preserve, and protects archaeological and scientific wonders, and an important bighorn sheep and desert tortoise habitat. It also features the longest undeveloped stretch of historic Route 66, a significant cultural landmark of the American West. Other natural treasures include Amboy Crater, North America's youngest volcano, the 550 million-year-old trilobite fossil beds of the Marble Mountains and the Cady Mountains, one of the best areas in the Mojave to spot bighorn sheep.

[Read: 6 Sinking Cities to Visit Before It's Too Late.]

Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, Colorado

The culturally rich Canyons of the Ancients Monuments offers a wide range of archaeological sites. Come for the Ancestral Puebloan history and stay for the unspoiled land of Colorado's high desert. It's not everywhere that culture, history and natural beauty blend so well. This monument is perfect if you want to get away from it all and be enveloped in the quiet of the outdoors. The Lowry Pueblo is the only developed recreation site within the monument. With interpretive signs and brochures on-site, you can take a self-guided tour of a historic Ancestral Puebloan structure. Make sure to explore the Trail of the Ancients National Scenic Byway that circles Canyons of the Ancients National Monument as well as the Anasazi Heritage Center, a nearby stop that will help shed light on the history and legend of the people who once settled the area. Chock-full of informative displays and cultural facts, the cultural center will allow you to enjoy a greater appreciation for the area's past.


15 Must-Visit National Park Attractions


Photo Gallery
National Parks in the U.S.
USA, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Midway Geyser Basin, Grand Prismatic Spring
Sunrise on Cadillac Mountain
the beautiful setting of Havasu Falls in Arizona. Taken under an overcast sky with a soft warm light highlighting the red sandstone, green cottonwoods and the famous turquoise waters of the lagoon.
It is a long walk to the top! Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, in Colorado. The park contains the tallest sand dunes in North America, rising about 750 feet (230 m) from the floor of the San Luis Valley on the western base of the Sangre de Cristo Range, covering about 19,000 acres (7,700 ha).
Hikers at the end of the Harding Icefield trail. Kenai Fjords National Park
The Narrows at Zion National Park
Landscape Arch in the Arches National Park, Utah, United States.
Tunnel View of Yosemite Valley with El Capitan, Half Dome and Yosemite Falls.
General Sherman Tree in Sequoia National Park
Gorgeous Crater lake on a summer day
Stunning vista with snow covered mountains, lush green alpine meadows and trees, on Highline trail in Glacier National Park, Montana USA.
Kilauea Lava Flow near former town of Kalapana, Big Island, Hawaii, USA
Hoh Rainforest in Olympic National Park
aerial view of Waterlemon Cay in Leinster Bay, St.John, US Virgin Islands
|

Here's where to make the most of the National Park Service centennial.
The National Park Service will be celebrating its centennial on Aug. 25. As part of the 100th anniversary, the National Park Service is waiving admission fees to all of its parks and sites for 16 days in 2016, including April 16 through 24 and Aug. 25 through 28, which means it's time for you to start planning your next big adventure. We've rounded up must-visit attractions at some of the nation's most popular and off-the-beaten-path parks to help you decide which national park to conquer this year. 
(Getty Images)

Grand Prismatic Spring
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Old Faithful gets a lot of love from visitors, but the Grand Prismatic Spring is just as much of a stunner. Measuring 370 feet in diameter, 120 feet in depth and reaching 189 degrees Fahrenheit, the Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest hot spring in the United States. Plus, it holds the distinction of being the most colorful attraction Yellowstone National Park has to offer. The many colors that make up the striking spring vary by season and are caused by the various types of bacteria that reside within its waters.
(Getty Images)

Cadillac Mountain
Acadia National Park, Maine

Cadillac Mountain isn't just another mountain to climb; it's the highest point on the North Atlantic seaboard. Located on Mount Desert Island in Maine, the mountain is a whopping 1,530 feet tall (higher than the Empire State Building and the Eiffel Tower) and provides magnificent views of the surrounding seaboard and the small islands that dot it. And thanks to its unique location, Cadillac Mountain is the first place in the U.S. to view the sunrise from Oct. 7 to March 6 every year.
(Getty Images)

Havasu Falls
Grand Canyon, Arizona 

Everyone knows if you want to get wet in the Grand Canyon, you should go river rafting in the Colorado River. But if you're looking for something a little less wild, hike to Havasu Falls about 2 miles north of Supai Village. There are many waterfalls that call the Grand Canyon home, but Havasu stands out for its turquoise-colored waters. The vibrant hue comes from minerals that live within the water, which combine with the sunlight to create its luminous shade. Mix that with the canyon's jagged red rock formations and surrounding lush greenery and you've got the perfect photo op, or a great swimming spot.  
(Getty Images)

High Dune
Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado

Located about three hours south of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve is one giant sandbox just waiting to be played in. Measuring 30 square miles wide, the park is known for housing North America's tallest sand dunes, including High Dune. Though not the tallest, it is the most manageable to traverse of the highest dunes with a two-hour hiking time. If you're looking to do more than just walk around, sand sports of all kinds are allowed as long as they are played away from vegetated areas.
(Getty Images)

Harding Icefield Trail
Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska 

The Harding Icefield, which is actually composed of 40 glaciers, is the star attraction in Kenai Fjords National Park. And to skip the Harding Icefield Trail would be like skipping the park altogether. This 8.2-mile round-trip hike takes visitors through the best assets of Kenai. Starting off on the valley floor, the trail winds through meadows and forests, providing expansive views of the park's icefield at the top. But come prepared: This hike is strenuous. Visitors gain 1,000 feet of elevation with each mile. 
(Getty Images)

The Narrows
Zion National Park, Utah

If you're looking for a challenge, there is no better place to get the blood pumping than The Narrows in Zion National Park. Far from your run-of-the-mill hike, The Narrows, as its name implies, is the narrowest section of Zion Canyon, and requires hikers to get both their hands and feet dirty. To complete the hike, visitors must travel upstream through the Virgin River and traverse through gorges that are at times only 20 to 30 feet wide. Although the trek is strenuous, hikers are rewarded with time spent surrounded by some of Mother Nature's most incredible architecture, including natural walls upward of 1,000 feet tall.
(Getty Images)

Landscape Arch
Arches National Park, Utah

Although it's impossible to see the 2,000-plus arches that reside within the park in one trip, try to add as many to your itinerary as possible. Key arches to see include Landscape Arch, the park's longest arch, Delicate Arch, which is featured on the Utah state license plate, and the Windows Trail, which is also visible from Turret Arch. 
(Getty Images)

Tunnel View Overlook
Yosemite National Park, California  

If you're not the kind of traveler who likes to take the most treacherous path, but you still want the vistas that typically come with those challenging journeys, the Tunnel View overlook is your best bet. If you follow U.S. Highway 41, all you have to do is continue on Wawona Road and you'll eventually hit one of the park's most famous lookouts. From Tunnel View, visitors are treated to scenic vistas of some of Yosemite's greatest attractions, including Half Dome, Bridalveil Fall and El Capitan. 
(Getty Images)

The General Sherman Tree
Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks, California 

You might want to do some stretching before visiting Sequoia National Park as your head will likely be fixed upward the entire time. That's because some of the largest trees in the world reside here. The General Sherman Tree is the largest tree in the world at 52,508 cubic feet tall. Plus, the parks' sequoias, which are about as tall as a 26-story building, grow 40 cubic feet each year, so the trees you see during your trip won't look the same if you ever decide to return. 
(Getty Images)

Crater Lake
Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

The lack of landmarks within this national park may deter some visitors, but Crater Lake's undeniable beauty more than makes up for its shortcomings. Crater Lake, as its name suggests, is set within the inactive Mount Mazama volcano. After a massive eruption in 5,700 B.C., the crater filled with rain and snow over time, creating what is now America's deepest (and possibly bluest) lake. The best time to witness this natural wonder is in the summer, when the sun further illuminates its deep blue waters and the 1,200-foot-tall cliffs that surround it. 
(Getty Images)

Highline Trail
Glacier National Park, Montana

There is no better place to feel like an explorer than the Highline Trail in Glacier National Park. The famous trail hugs the jagged cliffs that line the Continental Divide, affording dramatic views of the tall peaks, lush valleys and wildlife that dwell within. But be forewarned: those afraid of heights might want to sit this one out. A quarter mile into the hike the trail becomes only 4 to 6 feet wide with cables built into the wall for extra support. Luckily, that part of the trail lasts for less than half a mile.
(Getty Images)

Mount Kilauea
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park's top attraction is also the world's most active volcano, producing 200,000 to 500,000 cubic meters of lava per day (enough to cover a 20-mile long, two-lane road each day). Located on the park's famed Crater Rim Drive, Mount Kilauea offers visitors the unique opportunity to get up close and personal with this natural attraction at the Kilauea Overlook. 
(Getty Images)

Hoh Rain Forest
Olympic National Park, Washington 

Dripping in moss, dotted with giant conifers and blanketed with ferns, the Hoh Rain Forest looks like something out of a fairytale. What's more, the area gets 12 to 14 feet of precipitation per year, creating a misty atmosphere that only adds to its overall allure. The rainforest, unsurprisingly, is one of the park's most-visited attractions and is considered to be one of the best examples of a temperate rainforest in the U.S. And the forest features predominately short and flat hikes, making it the perfect place for a relaxing stroll. 
(Getty Images)

Leinster Bay and Waterlemon Cay
Virgin Islands National Park, U.S. Virgin Islands 

With more than 40 percent of this Caribbean destination covered in water, it's the perfect place for some subaquatic adventures. The park features multiple bays and beaches waiting to be explored, with throngs of coral reefs and wildlife ready to make an appearance as you embark on your journey under the sea. Beginner snorkelers and scuba divers will appreciate Francis Bay and the Underwater Trail at Trunk Bay, while those looking for a challenge should consider traversing Leinster Bay and Waterlemon Cay, the former of which features a big drop into the ocean.  
(Getty Images)

Bryce Amphitheater
Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah 

The most-visited section in this Utah national park is also the easiest to reach. Just a 14-minute drive from the park's visitor center, Bryce Amphitheater is truly a sight to behold. The stunning rock spires that comprise the 6-mile-long attraction were formed after millions of years of erosion. The attraction is also unique in that it seemingly changes colors dependent on the placement of the sun. If you can, swing by during sunrise or sunset to see Bryce Amphitheater at its most photogenic time of day.
(Getty Images)

National Parks in the U.S.
USA, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Midway Geyser Basin, Grand Prismatic Spring
Sunrise on Cadillac Mountain
the beautiful setting of Havasu Falls in Arizona. Taken under an overcast sky with a soft warm light highlighting the red sandstone, green cottonwoods and the famous turquoise waters of the lagoon.
It is a long walk to the top! Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, in Colorado. The park contains the tallest sand dunes in North America, rising about 750 feet (230 m) from the floor of the San Luis Valley on the western base of the Sangre de Cristo Range, covering about 19,000 acres (7,700 ha).
Hikers at the end of the Harding Icefield trail. Kenai Fjords National Park
The Narrows at Zion National Park
Landscape Arch in the Arches National Park, Utah, United States.
Tunnel View of Yosemite Valley with El Capitan, Half Dome and Yosemite Falls.
General Sherman Tree in Sequoia National Park
Gorgeous Crater lake on a summer day
Stunning vista with snow covered mountains, lush green alpine meadows and trees, on Highline trail in Glacier National Park, Montana USA.
Kilauea Lava Flow near former town of Kalapana, Big Island, Hawaii, USA
Hoh Rainforest in Olympic National Park
aerial view of Waterlemon Cay in Leinster Bay, St.John, US Virgin Islands
Morning sunlight over the amphitheater at Bryce Canyon viewed from Inspiration Point.

Here's where to make the most of the National Park Service centennial.
The National Park Service will be celebrating its centennial on Aug. 25. As part of the 100th anniversary, the National Park Service is waiving admission fees to all of its parks and sites for 16 days in 2016, including April 16 through 24 and Aug. 25 through 28, which means it's time for you to start planning your next big adventure. We've rounded up must-visit attractions at some of the nation's most popular and off-the-beaten-path parks to help you decide which national park to conquer this year. 
(Getty Images)

Grand Prismatic Spring
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Old Faithful gets a lot of love from visitors, but the Grand Prismatic Spring is just as much of a stunner. Measuring 370 feet in diameter, 120 feet in depth and reaching 189 degrees Fahrenheit, the Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest hot spring in the United States. Plus, it holds the distinction of being the most colorful attraction Yellowstone National Park has to offer. The many colors that make up the striking spring vary by season and are caused by the various types of bacteria that reside within its waters.
(Getty Images)

Cadillac Mountain
Acadia National Park, Maine

Cadillac Mountain isn't just another mountain to climb; it's the highest point on the North Atlantic seaboard. Located on Mount Desert Island in Maine, the mountain is a whopping 1,530 feet tall (higher than the Empire State Building and the Eiffel Tower) and provides magnificent views of the surrounding seaboard and the small islands that dot it. And thanks to its unique location, Cadillac Mountain is the first place in the U.S. to view the sunrise from Oct. 7 to March 6 every year.
(Getty Images)

Havasu Falls
Grand Canyon, Arizona 

Everyone knows if you want to get wet in the Grand Canyon, you should go river rafting in the Colorado River. But if you're looking for something a little less wild, hike to Havasu Falls about 2 miles north of Supai Village. There are many waterfalls that call the Grand Canyon home, but Havasu stands out for its turquoise-colored waters. The vibrant hue comes from minerals that live within the water, which combine with the sunlight to create its luminous shade. Mix that with the canyon's jagged red rock formations and surrounding lush greenery and you've got the perfect photo op, or a great swimming spot.  
(Getty Images)

High Dune
Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado

Located about three hours south of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve is one giant sandbox just waiting to be played in. Measuring 30 square miles wide, the park is known for housing North America's tallest sand dunes, including High Dune. Though not the tallest, it is the most manageable to traverse of the highest dunes with a two-hour hiking time. If you're looking to do more than just walk around, sand sports of all kinds are allowed as long as they are played away from vegetated areas.
(Getty Images)

Harding Icefield Trail
Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska 

The Harding Icefield, which is actually composed of 40 glaciers, is the star attraction in Kenai Fjords National Park. And to skip the Harding Icefield Trail would be like skipping the park altogether. This 8.2-mile round-trip hike takes visitors through the best assets of Kenai. Starting off on the valley floor, the trail winds through meadows and forests, providing expansive views of the park's icefield at the top. But come prepared: This hike is strenuous. Visitors gain 1,000 feet of elevation with each mile. 
(Getty Images)

The Narrows
Zion National Park, Utah

If you're looking for a challenge, there is no better place to get the blood pumping than The Narrows in Zion National Park. Far from your run-of-the-mill hike, The Narrows, as its name implies, is the narrowest section of Zion Canyon, and requires hikers to get both their hands and feet dirty. To complete the hike, visitors must travel upstream through the Virgin River and traverse through gorges that are at times only 20 to 30 feet wide. Although the trek is strenuous, hikers are rewarded with time spent surrounded by some of Mother Nature's most incredible architecture, including natural walls upward of 1,000 feet tall.
(Getty Images)

Landscape Arch
Arches National Park, Utah

Although it's impossible to see the 2,000-plus arches that reside within the park in one trip, try to add as many to your itinerary as possible. Key arches to see include Landscape Arch, the park's longest arch, Delicate Arch, which is featured on the Utah state license plate, and the Windows Trail, which is also visible from Turret Arch. 
(Getty Images)

Tunnel View Overlook
Yosemite National Park, California  

If you're not the kind of traveler who likes to take the most treacherous path, but you still want the vistas that typically come with those challenging journeys, the Tunnel View overlook is your best bet. If you follow U.S. Highway 41, all you have to do is continue on Wawona Road and you'll eventually hit one of the park's most famous lookouts. From Tunnel View, visitors are treated to scenic vistas of some of Yosemite's greatest attractions, including Half Dome, Bridalveil Fall and El Capitan. 
(Getty Images)

The General Sherman Tree
Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks, California 

You might want to do some stretching before visiting Sequoia National Park as your head will likely be fixed upward the entire time. That's because some of the largest trees in the world reside here. The General Sherman Tree is the largest tree in the world at 52,508 cubic feet tall. Plus, the parks' sequoias, which are about as tall as a 26-story building, grow 40 cubic feet each year, so the trees you see during your trip won't look the same if you ever decide to return. 
(Getty Images)

Crater Lake
Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

The lack of landmarks within this national park may deter some visitors, but Crater Lake's undeniable beauty more than makes up for its shortcomings. Crater Lake, as its name suggests, is set within the inactive Mount Mazama volcano. After a massive eruption in 5,700 B.C., the crater filled with rain and snow over time, creating what is now America's deepest (and possibly bluest) lake. The best time to witness this natural wonder is in the summer, when the sun further illuminates its deep blue waters and the 1,200-foot-tall cliffs that surround it. 
(Getty Images)

Highline Trail
Glacier National Park, Montana

There is no better place to feel like an explorer than the Highline Trail in Glacier National Park. The famous trail hugs the jagged cliffs that line the Continental Divide, affording dramatic views of the tall peaks, lush valleys and wildlife that dwell within. But be forewarned: those afraid of heights might want to sit this one out. A quarter mile into the hike the trail becomes only 4 to 6 feet wide with cables built into the wall for extra support. Luckily, that part of the trail lasts for less than half a mile.
(Getty Images)

Mount Kilauea
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park's top attraction is also the world's most active volcano, producing 200,000 to 500,000 cubic meters of lava per day (enough to cover a 20-mile long, two-lane road each day). Located on the park's famed Crater Rim Drive, Mount Kilauea offers visitors the unique opportunity to get up close and personal with this natural attraction at the Kilauea Overlook. 
(Getty Images)

Hoh Rain Forest
Olympic National Park, Washington 

Dripping in moss, dotted with giant conifers and blanketed with ferns, the Hoh Rain Forest looks like something out of a fairytale. What's more, the area gets 12 to 14 feet of precipitation per year, creating a misty atmosphere that only adds to its overall allure. The rainforest, unsurprisingly, is one of the park's most-visited attractions and is considered to be one of the best examples of a temperate rainforest in the U.S. And the forest features predominately short and flat hikes, making it the perfect place for a relaxing stroll. 
(Getty Images)

Leinster Bay and Waterlemon Cay
Virgin Islands National Park, U.S. Virgin Islands 

With more than 40 percent of this Caribbean destination covered in water, it's the perfect place for some subaquatic adventures. The park features multiple bays and beaches waiting to be explored, with throngs of coral reefs and wildlife ready to make an appearance as you embark on your journey under the sea. Beginner snorkelers and scuba divers will appreciate Francis Bay and the Underwater Trail at Trunk Bay, while those looking for a challenge should consider traversing Leinster Bay and Waterlemon Cay, the former of which features a big drop into the ocean.  
(Getty Images)

Bryce Amphitheater
Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah 

The most-visited section in this Utah national park is also the easiest to reach. Just a 14-minute drive from the park's visitor center, Bryce Amphitheater is truly a sight to behold. The stunning rock spires that comprise the 6-mile-long attraction were formed after millions of years of erosion. The attraction is also unique in that it seemingly changes colors dependent on the placement of the sun. If you can, swing by during sunrise or sunset to see Bryce Amphitheater at its most photogenic time of day.
(Getty Images)

×

Tags: travel, vacations


Sheryl Nance-Nash is a freelance writer, specializing in travel, business and personal finance. Her travel articles have appeared in Upscale Magazine, Orbitz.com, Cheapoair.com, The Tennessean, BeachDeals.com, Lincoln Star Journal, Knoxville News Sentinel, the Williamsport SunGazette and TheRichest.com. Her business and personal articles have appeared in The New York Times, Money, Forbes.com, DailyFinance.com, Newsday, ABCNews.com, Black Enterprise, Essence and others. Connect with her on LinkedIn.

Recommended Articles

How to Find Cheap Flights

Holly Johnson | Dec. 13, 2018

These tips can help you see the world at prices you can afford.

5 Ways to Save Money on Honeymoon Travel

Nicola Wood | Dec. 11, 2018

Create priceless honeymoon memories without breaking the bank.

9 Small Towns That Go All Out for Christmas

Dec. 4, 2018

You don't have to travel to a big city to experience nonstop Christmas fun.

17 Family Ski Vacations to Take This Winter

Nov. 26, 2018

These family-friendly mountain resorts offer exceptional snow sports and activities for all ages.

The 50 Most Scenic Mountain Resorts

Nov. 19, 2018

Get away to enjoy the views and activities at these properties around the world.

The 5 Top Health and Wellness Trends in Cruising

Nicola Wood | Nov. 13, 2018

Find out how taking a cruise can support your health, fitness and nutrition goals.

10 New Cruise Ships and Amenities to Check Out

Nov. 13, 2018

See how cruise lines are raising the bar with tech-savvy touches and improved luxury experiences.

The 2019 Best Cruise Lines for the Money

Nov. 13, 2018

Find out which lines will help you save big on your next cruise vacation.

10 Travel Photography Tips for Getting Better Photos

Nov. 8, 2018

These tips can help you snap stunning and creative images without a fancy camera – or any experience.

What Is a Boutique Hotel?

Lyn Mettler | Oct. 22, 2018

Learn more about these accommodations and why they are so popular.