Couple relaxing in hot tub at luxury spa drinking champagne overlooking wine country.

Whether you want to enjoy yoga, scenic hikes or guided meditation, you can rejuvenate the mind, body and soul at top wellness retreats, found everywhere from Arizona to Georgia. (Getty Images)

Destination spas once consisted of little more than a few massage rooms and yoga mats. But today, a variety of treatments and experiences oriented around mental, physical and emotional fitness are all part of bespoke wellness retreats being offered by spas throughout the country. Curated programs, featuring everything from Ayurvedic medicine practices to forest bathing, are offered to boost balance between the body, mind and soul. What's more, today's destination spas also cater to those with special dietary needs while traveling with innovative and nutritious menu options, including vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free dishes. So, if you're ready to unplug and recharge, retreat to these indulgent wellness getaways across America.

[See: 10 Top Wellness Retreats Around the Globe.]

The Lodge at Sea Island
Sea Island, Georgia

At Sea Island's 65,000-square-foot spa facility, guests can unwind with a wide array of treatments. From pampering to playful, The Spa at Sea Island offers soothing spaces with swaying palms and smooth stones, along with a mineral pool and steam room. At The Performance Therapy Center at The Lodge, an extension of The Spa at Sea Island, you can try cryotherapy, a popular sports recovery technique. The treatment, which involves taking a very short and extremely intense ice bath after a period of physical activity, is available in 15-minute sessions, during which guests receive a professional consultation and three minutes in the cryotherapy unit. For a more relaxing treatment, get pampered with a customized Swedish massage, a milk and honey facial or replenishing body wrap.

The Lodge at Woodloch
Hawley, Pennsylvania

Imagine a luxury destination spa where you can attend customized wellness-driven classes and enjoy personalized activities. That's what you'll find at this tranquil getaway in the Pocono Mountains. The Lodge at Woodloch pampers guests from the moment they arrive with an array of wellness programs and culinary options. Float Therapy, a recent offering, is a powerful tool for wellness, pain relief and better sleep. What's more, at the adults-only spa, you can enjoy soothing facials, massages and body treatments to unwind and recharge.

The Ranch at Rock Creek
Philipsburg, Montana

The Granite Spa at The Ranch at Rock Creek has evolved from a guest treatment sanctuary – offering signature massages like the Saddle Sore Soak – to a full-blown wellness center providing year-round wilderness activities. Integrating nature into its spa experience, the ranch offers a raft of natural plant-based spa treatments like a Clearing Sage Brush Scrub that takes place outdoors. Other specialized programs at the ranch include Wellness in the Wilderness retreats, meditation, yoga and forest bathing.

Shore Lodge
McCall, Idaho

Inspired by its mountain landscape and its glacier-carved Payette Lake, The Cove Spa at Shore Lodge offers guests a space to unplug and embrace their natural surroundings. Guests can indulge in massages, body treatments, facials utilizing Eminence Organics skincare products and saltwater immersion pools. The signature Deep Blue Wrap utilizes antioxidants in blueberries combined with green and black tea in a full-body wrap. Meanwhile, the Borah Peak treatment includes a Skipping Stones Massage, a Clearwater Scrub, a Forest Flora Facial and a health spa lunch, along with a manicure and pedicure.

[Read: 10 Tips for Planning an Affordable Spa Getaway.]

Gansevoort Park Avenue NYC
New York City

Need a respite from the frantic pace of New York City? Slip away to the Gansevoort Park Avenue NYC, where you can enjoy replenishing treatments at the Exhale Gramercy. Guests can experience a Core Fusion Barre, cardio or yoga class in the light-filled, glass-walled studio overlooking Park Avenue South. Afterward, take your pick from a wide range of spa offerings, from massages to facials to acupuncture therapies. Try reiki, a unique healing therapy, or if you're looking to amp up you fitness routine, the property's intimate gym rounds out the Exhale experience.

Cal-a-Vie Health Spa
Vista, California

Offering over 150 classes, Cal-a-Vie Health Spa's relaxed countryside setting offers an ideal destination to boost fitness, wellness and nutrition. Guests can begin each morning with a hike in the mountains surrounding the property, followed by a fitness class and their choice of pampering spa treatment in the afternoon. Plus, the spa utilizes Wellness FX, a digital test that measures cardiovascular, metabolic, hormonal and nutritional health with a simple blood test. What's more, it is the first destination spa in the U.S. to incorporate MUSE, a brain-sensing headband that help users focus on meditation through brain-wave analysis.

L'Auberge de Sedona
Sedona, Arizona

At L'Auberge de Sedona's L'Apothecary Spa, there's a wide variety of desert-inspired treatments aimed at connecting guests to the area's naturally healing properties. The Feet-in-the-Creek treatment, for example, focuses on earth and nature with a three-part process that incorporates stepping into the ankle-deep water to breathe in the fresh Sedona air and listen to the soothing sounds of Oak Creek before a foot reflexology treatment. Meanwhile, the Moonlit Mediation is held around full moon phases at Serenity Point, the resort's outdoor spiritual space. These guided mediation sessions aim to help guests find inner peace though Sound Healing, which is customized with sound and designed to create a deep state of relaxation.

Stowe Mountain Lodge
Stowe, Vermont

With its covered bridges, historic village and quaint shops, Stowe is the quintessential New England town. At Stowe Mountain Lodge's luxurious Spa at Stowe Mountain Lodge, guests have access to 18 treatment rooms, a relaxing sanctuary lounge with stunning views of Mt. Mansfield, a dry sauna, hot tubs, a fitness center and an outdoor pool. The pool has two lap lanes and is heated year-round. For the guest that enjoys breaking a sweat, the spa's fitness center is equipped with TechnoGym equipment and two studios offering a variety of classes, from yoga to spinning to boot camp. Even better, the spa offers 75 services, including body treatments, facials and kids-focused treatments for guests 6 and older.

[See: 10 Under-the-Radar Spa Retreats.]

Sonnenalp
Vail, Colorado

Situated in picturesque Vail, Sonnenalp's top-notch spa offers an opulent retreat to recharge and rejuvenate. Guests have access to a grand fireplace, a steam room, a tranquility pool and oxygen bar. Take your pick from a mountain sports massage, a deluxe caviar facial, a high-alpine hydration or another replenishing treatment. After you're feeling recharged, enjoy hiking along scenic trails and private yoga classes, among other wellness-focused activities.


10 Tips for a Healthier Vacation


Photo Gallery
Germany, Cologne, Mid adult man looking through widow
packet of face wipes
Almonds in a bowl
Cropped Hand Reaching For Drinking Glass By Airplane Window
Black man listening to earbuds on airplane
Woman stretching on airplane
Middle aged man in jet-plane cabin with influenza wearing surgical face-mask,
Suitcase with first-aid kit
Older woman sleeping in a bed.
A young athletic man exercises at home.
Woman opens window over sea, in bath robe
|

Stay happy and healthy in transit with these expert-endorsed tricks.
Let's get this out of the way: While navigating congested airline terminals, sitting in cramped plane cabins and eating unhealthy in-flight snacks, it's easy to get sick in transit. But happily, there are time-tested techniques for beating fatigue, aches and other travel ailments. That's why U.S. News got the inside scoop from fitness gurus, wellness buffs, medical experts and avid travelers on their top tricks for maintaining their health and well-being on the fly. Keep reading for expert-approved hacks for a healthier getaway.
(Getty Images)

Arrive prepared.
"It's important to keep your immune system strong at all times, but especially before a long flight to a foreign destination," says Anne Dimon, industry journalist and CEO of wellness travel site TravelToWellness.com. She advises getting plenty of rest ahead of your trip and packing strategically to avoid germ-invested services. "I bring antibacterial wipes with me and use two every time on a plane. One for the overhead and the tray table – don't forget the back of the seat in front of you – and one for the chair and armrests," says Heather Peterson, CorePower Yoga's chief yoga officer, who travels up to 40 weeks per year.
(Getty Images)

Carry vitamins and nutritious snacks and beverages.
Carrie Dorr, founder of Pure Barre, likes to load up on vitamin C with oranges or a drink supplement like Emergen-C, before traveling. Peterson also stows away nutrition bars as emergency in-flight food. She also brings "bitter greens, whole grains like brown rice or quinoa, and good fats like coconut or olive oil that reduce inflammation. I always carry dark chocolate in small quantities as a treat," she explains. Peterson also cites vitamin D3, unsalted nuts and fresh apples as top travel items. "They all pack well and will get you through with great energy," she says.
(Getty Images)

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.
The key to preventing in-flight and post-flight achiness and fatigue is dodging dehydration. "Coconut water is at most airports now, so I grab that plus water, then I get hot water with lemon on the plane," Peterson says, noting that sipping hot water is an ancient Ayurvedic practice (a 3,500-year-old traditional Hindu healing remedy) to hydrate the body. Dimon also recommends staying hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout all stages of your trip. If your final destination, hotel or restaurant can't ensure safe drinking water, pick up bottled water, she adds.
(Getty Images)

Practice meditation.
To get yourself in vacation mode, Peterson suggests unplugging with meditation before takeoff. "I meditate with Deepak Chopra or listen to great books on the plane," she says. "I work, too, but I always use the first and last part of the flight for meditation, then I am grounded during the travel process and arrive refreshed to my destination," she adds. Some free, travel-friendly meditation apps worth downloading include Simple Habit and Calm.
(Getty Images)

Take mid-flight stretch breaks.
While flying, "get up and stretch when possible," Dorr says. "If you can't stand, even seated stretches are beneficial," she says. Peterson also recommends moving whenever possible. She circles her ankles and does a seated twist every 20 minutes and walks around the cabin every hour. If you're gearing up for long-haul international trip, try to snag an aisle seat. That way, you can enjoy the flexibility of standing up and walking around more regularly (without irking other travelers) to reduce the risks of blood clots after sitting for extended periods.
(Getty Images)

Mitigate contact with germs from fellow passengers.
"A face mask is the most helpful if worn by the person who has the respiratory illness, so that they don't shed disease germs into the environment around them," explains Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky, travelers' health consultant to the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a professor at Emory University's School of Medicine. If you're seated next to an ill passenger, ask the flight crew if you can switch seats. Also use hand wipes or gels liberally before eating, Kozarsky adds. "It is unrealistic to think that those cleaning the cabins in between flights can decontaminate the cabin," she cautions.
(Getty Images)

Pack other essential items.
Kozarsky suggests packing a basic travel health kit stocked with first-aid items and supplies that you would "have at home in the event of a minor ailment." She also stresses the importance of carrying your own prescription drugs and ensuring you bring them on the airplane rather than checking them to ensure you don't lose them. Other must-have essentials: workout clothes and sneakers, a moisturizer for your hands and feet, lavender essential oil and ear plugs, Dorr says. Dimon also recommends bringing sunscreen and a "sun-safe, broad-rimmed hat," particularly if you're planning to be in the sun for an extended period.
(Getty Images)

Fight fatigue and jet lag.
If you'll be switching time zones, make sure to reduce undesirable effects of jet lag, including irritability, disorientation, fatigue and hunger, by prepping your body. Dimon suggests "easing your system into that time zone several days before your flight." For instance, "if you are heading to Europe, try to get to bed a little earlier each night leading up to your departure," she says. In addition to getting a quality night's sleep, Dimon recommends eating meals at the mealtimes of your final destination several days before your trip. Aside from modifying your inner clock, drink plenty of water and, if possible, get exposure to sunlight after you arrive to reduce the toll on your body.
(Getty Images)

Keep up your fitness regimen in your hotel room.
Stay calm with a workout, such as a yoga session, after you arrive. If you can't access a yoga studio, you can keep up your usual routine in your hotel room, Peterson explains. She suggests laying down a towel or yoga mat and striking a travel-friendly pose, such as downward-facing dog, a supine twist, a supine figure four (or pigeon-hold) and holding your legs against the wall. Dorr also suggests incorporating a towel or utilizing your own body weight to optimize an in-room workout. "If you can squeeze a resistance tube in your suitcase, it can double as a tool for strength training as well as stretching," she explains.
(Getty Images)

Establish a healthy living space.
To rest easy, seek out wellness-focused accommodations and make sure to boost air circulation by opening your hotel room windows, Peterson says. She also recommends using an antibacterial spray to sanitize all living quarters, including bathroom areas. Kozarsky recommends washing your hands often. "Some studies have shown that items such as telephones and TV remotes harbor large amounts of bacteria," she cautions, adding that wiping down items with alcohol hand wipes can help reduce contact with germs. Another concern: germ-infested bedspreads. Consider whether your hotel has duvets, which are encased with covers that can be washed easily, rather than bedspreads, which are laundered less often than bedsheets and covers.
(Getty Images)

Germany, Cologne, Mid adult man looking through widow
packet of face wipes
Almonds in a bowl
Cropped Hand Reaching For Drinking Glass By Airplane Window
Black man listening to earbuds on airplane
Woman stretching on airplane
Middle aged man in jet-plane cabin with influenza wearing surgical face-mask,
Suitcase with first-aid kit
Older woman sleeping in a bed.
A young athletic man exercises at home.
Woman opens window over sea, in bath robe

Stay happy and healthy in transit with these expert-endorsed tricks.
Let's get this out of the way: While navigating congested airline terminals, sitting in cramped plane cabins and eating unhealthy in-flight snacks, it's easy to get sick in transit. But happily, there are time-tested techniques for beating fatigue, aches and other travel ailments. That's why U.S. News got the inside scoop from fitness gurus, wellness buffs, medical experts and avid travelers on their top tricks for maintaining their health and well-being on the fly. Keep reading for expert-approved hacks for a healthier getaway.
(Getty Images)

Arrive prepared.
"It's important to keep your immune system strong at all times, but especially before a long flight to a foreign destination," says Anne Dimon, industry journalist and CEO of wellness travel site TravelToWellness.com. She advises getting plenty of rest ahead of your trip and packing strategically to avoid germ-invested services. "I bring antibacterial wipes with me and use two every time on a plane. One for the overhead and the tray table – don't forget the back of the seat in front of you – and one for the chair and armrests," says Heather Peterson, CorePower Yoga's chief yoga officer, who travels up to 40 weeks per year.
(Getty Images)

Carry vitamins and nutritious snacks and beverages.
Carrie Dorr, founder of Pure Barre, likes to load up on vitamin C with oranges or a drink supplement like Emergen-C, before traveling. Peterson also stows away nutrition bars as emergency in-flight food. She also brings "bitter greens, whole grains like brown rice or quinoa, and good fats like coconut or olive oil that reduce inflammation. I always carry dark chocolate in small quantities as a treat," she explains. Peterson also cites vitamin D3, unsalted nuts and fresh apples as top travel items. "They all pack well and will get you through with great energy," she says.
(Getty Images)

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.
The key to preventing in-flight and post-flight achiness and fatigue is dodging dehydration. "Coconut water is at most airports now, so I grab that plus water, then I get hot water with lemon on the plane," Peterson says, noting that sipping hot water is an ancient Ayurvedic practice (a 3,500-year-old traditional Hindu healing remedy) to hydrate the body. Dimon also recommends staying hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout all stages of your trip. If your final destination, hotel or restaurant can't ensure safe drinking water, pick up bottled water, she adds.
(Getty Images)

Practice meditation.
To get yourself in vacation mode, Peterson suggests unplugging with meditation before takeoff. "I meditate with Deepak Chopra or listen to great books on the plane," she says. "I work, too, but I always use the first and last part of the flight for meditation, then I am grounded during the travel process and arrive refreshed to my destination," she adds. Some free, travel-friendly meditation apps worth downloading include Simple Habit and Calm.
(Getty Images)

Take mid-flight stretch breaks.
While flying, "get up and stretch when possible," Dorr says. "If you can't stand, even seated stretches are beneficial," she says. Peterson also recommends moving whenever possible. She circles her ankles and does a seated twist every 20 minutes and walks around the cabin every hour. If you're gearing up for long-haul international trip, try to snag an aisle seat. That way, you can enjoy the flexibility of standing up and walking around more regularly (without irking other travelers) to reduce the risks of blood clots after sitting for extended periods.
(Getty Images)

Mitigate contact with germs from fellow passengers.
"A face mask is the most helpful if worn by the person who has the respiratory illness, so that they don't shed disease germs into the environment around them," explains Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky, travelers' health consultant to the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a professor at Emory University's School of Medicine. If you're seated next to an ill passenger, ask the flight crew if you can switch seats. Also use hand wipes or gels liberally before eating, Kozarsky adds. "It is unrealistic to think that those cleaning the cabins in between flights can decontaminate the cabin," she cautions.
(Getty Images)

Pack other essential items.
Kozarsky suggests packing a basic travel health kit stocked with first-aid items and supplies that you would "have at home in the event of a minor ailment." She also stresses the importance of carrying your own prescription drugs and ensuring you bring them on the airplane rather than checking them to ensure you don't lose them. Other must-have essentials: workout clothes and sneakers, a moisturizer for your hands and feet, lavender essential oil and ear plugs, Dorr says. Dimon also recommends bringing sunscreen and a "sun-safe, broad-rimmed hat," particularly if you're planning to be in the sun for an extended period.
(Getty Images)

Fight fatigue and jet lag.
If you'll be switching time zones, make sure to reduce undesirable effects of jet lag, including irritability, disorientation, fatigue and hunger, by prepping your body. Dimon suggests "easing your system into that time zone several days before your flight." For instance, "if you are heading to Europe, try to get to bed a little earlier each night leading up to your departure," she says. In addition to getting a quality night's sleep, Dimon recommends eating meals at the mealtimes of your final destination several days before your trip. Aside from modifying your inner clock, drink plenty of water and, if possible, get exposure to sunlight after you arrive to reduce the toll on your body.
(Getty Images)

Keep up your fitness regimen in your hotel room.
Stay calm with a workout, such as a yoga session, after you arrive. If you can't access a yoga studio, you can keep up your usual routine in your hotel room, Peterson explains. She suggests laying down a towel or yoga mat and striking a travel-friendly pose, such as downward-facing dog, a supine twist, a supine figure four (or pigeon-hold) and holding your legs against the wall. Dorr also suggests incorporating a towel or utilizing your own body weight to optimize an in-room workout. "If you can squeeze a resistance tube in your suitcase, it can double as a tool for strength training as well as stretching," she explains.
(Getty Images)

Establish a healthy living space.
To rest easy, seek out wellness-focused accommodations and make sure to boost air circulation by opening your hotel room windows, Peterson says. She also recommends using an antibacterial spray to sanitize all living quarters, including bathroom areas. Kozarsky recommends washing your hands often. "Some studies have shown that items such as telephones and TV remotes harbor large amounts of bacteria," she cautions, adding that wiping down items with alcohol hand wipes can help reduce contact with germs. Another concern: germ-infested bedspreads. Consider whether your hotel has duvets, which are encased with covers that can be washed easily, rather than bedspreads, which are laundered less often than bedsheets and covers.
(Getty Images)

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Tags: travel, vacations


Roger Sands is an experienced travel writer with a passion for destinations that inform and inspire. His features on unique and exotic destinations have been published by the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Taste & Travel Magazine, BELLA NYC and others. He develops Top Ten lists in order to offer practical advice to travelers who are seeking guides to exciting worldwide locations. You can find him on LinkedIn.

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